#2
You are in C because all of those chords are in C.
C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim

EDIT: Also becuase the notes in C are C, D, E, F, G, A, B and the notes in the chords are as follows
C chord - C, E, G
G chord - G, B, D
Am chord - A, C, E
F chord - F, A, C
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Last edited by guitarded32 at Jun 29, 2009,
#3
I want to say C major but it starts with Am and ends with a dominant chord so it leaves it hanging. Can't be G major because of that F. I'd say A minor but C G and F are the ideal chords for C major.
#5
Your in A minor (in a minor lol, nvm). Ok, so I won't go in depth as to why your in that key, since that would be very long and the resources to learn about that online are all there (just search for theory), but I'll give you this cheap trick I'd use before I knew all the theory behind it. In general, when you have a simple chord progression, the first chord will be the key your in.
#6
Quote by pwrmax
I want to say C major but it starts with Am and ends with a dominant chord so it leaves it hanging. Can't be G major because of that F. I'd say A minor but C G and F are the ideal chords for C major.


just cause it doesnt start with the C doesnt mean it cant be it
but agreed with the ending dominant
but its C
#7
Quote by intentionsthere
Your in A minor (in a minor lol, nvm). Ok, so I won't go in depth as to why your in that key, since that would be very long and the resources to learn about that online are all there (just search for theory), but I'll give you this cheap trick I'd use before I knew all the theory behind it. In general, when you have a simple chord progression, the first chord will be the key your in.


That way of thinking is wrong, and this progression is a perfect example of why. It's a vi - I - V - IV - I - V progression. It is obviously not going to feel 'complete' ending on the G, because G is the dominant of C. It wants to pull back to it. Trying to tell a chord progression by the first chord is an absolute terrible way of telling a chord progression. It has no validity at all, you're simply guessing. An accurate way of telling what key you're in is simply by playing it and seeing what it resolves to. If that fails you, you could always analyze it, but playing and using your ear to determine the tonal center is a much more effective and useful way of telling your key.
#8
Quote by timeconsumer09
That way of thinking is wrong, and this progression is a perfect example of why. It's a vi - I - V - IV - I - V progression. It is obviously not going to feel 'complete' ending on the G, because G is the dominant of C. It wants to pull back to it. Trying to tell a chord progression by the first chord is an absolute terrible way of telling a chord progression. It has no validity at all, you're simply guessing. An accurate way of telling what key you're in is simply by playing it and seeing what it resolves to. If that fails you, you could always analyze it, but playing and using your ear to determine the tonal center is a much more effective and useful way of telling your key.


I didn't pay a close look to the chord progression to be honest and now that I do I realize I was completely wrong. To be honest, even though I have a background in jazz and classical guitar, to know if a chord progression is in a major key or it's relative minor, I usually trust my ear.

But as for the trick, for people who don't wanna learn theory, it's surprising how many times it'll give you the right answer (When it comes to folk/rock/pop type songs)
#9
Quote by intentionsthere
I didn't pay a close look to the chord progression to be honest and now that I do I realize I was completely wrong. To be honest, even though I have a background in jazz and classical guitar, to know if a chord progression is in a major key or it's relative minor, I usually trust my ear.

But as for the trick, for people who don't wanna learn theory, it's surprising how many times it'll give you the right answer (When it comes to folk/rock/pop type songs)


But in the end, using that 'method', all you're doing is relying on the fact that the songwriter chose to start the song on the root chord. If people don't even want to learn enough theory to tell what key a song is in, I'm not sure they should be playing the instrument. And yes, i know people have become greats knowing 'little or no theory', but those cases (if they're even true) are the extremely small minority, and most people don't possess the natural ability or drive to be able to learn the instrument and make their own in-depth observations and relationships on the instrument.

tl;dr Just learn the little theory you need to figure out the key, it's not that hard.
#10
Look for resolution, which will usually become apparent if there are cadences, preferably authentic cadences. There are no authentic cadence, but there's a plagal cadence to C and another to G, so it's likely it's either in C or G (depending on the melody and context). I'd say it's more likely that it's in C instead of G, since Fmaj does not appear diatonically in G.

There is nothing in this progression that resolves to Am, so it's definitely not in A minor.
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#12
C Major.

If you've got two major chords together - like F and G - its likely that they are the IV V chords, so work out what major scale would have those IV and V chords, then see if the other chords in your progression fit. If they do, then you've just got to see where it resolves to to find out if its major or minor.
#13
Quote by timeconsumer09
But in the end, using that 'method', all you're doing is relying on the fact that the songwriter chose to start the song on the root chord. If people don't even want to learn enough theory to tell what key a song is in, I'm not sure they should be playing the instrument. And yes, i know people have become greats knowing 'little or no theory', but those cases (if they're even true) are the extremely small minority, and most people don't possess the natural ability or drive to be able to learn the instrument and make their own in-depth observations and relationships on the instrument.

tl;dr Just learn the little theory you need to figure out the key, it's not that hard.


Alright, check, I think theory is great and I know a lot of it, and the greatest part about it is when you start using theory without having to think about it if you know what I mean. That being said, I was a guitar teacher for a while, and from that I've learned that the VAST majority of people try to stay away from theory.

It's not wrong to learn it, it's not right to learn it, it all depends on what your goals as a guitarist are. If you just want to be able to play a few songs by your favorite bands, you won't need it. I like to believe people that start off just wanting to play a few songs will eventually become passionate about it, but I haven't seen it happen too much.