#1
If you're both good enough to play lead both, or at least both of you can play lead well, is it a bad idea to keep switching between lead and rhythm guitar?
#3
not at all, look at Iron Maiden and Judas Preist they did that and it seems to have worked for them lol
#5
It seems to work well for bands like Maiden, Priest and Megadeth, gives a good mix. Especially because guitarists play solos differently, so it'll have diversity to it.
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#6
There is no set method as the guys before me have said. Do it how you want to. Isn't that why we all became musicians in the first place?

The way my band does it is we know what types of leads I will do or Aaron our other guitar player will do and we divide the parts up in order to maximize the effectiveness of our individual styles. He favors a more laid back picking/arpeggiated sound with a tape delay type warble...almost loop like. I am more of the face melting guy, so obviously we play to our strentghs.
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#7
Me and my other guitarist don't think of ourselves as rhythm or lead guitarists. Depending on who's singing the song and who prefers/can be bothered learning whichever part, either of us could play the "lead" part or the "rhythm" part. Bands like the Strokes are good for not really using traditional rhythm or lead parts, but more "guitar 1 and guitar 2" roles where everything fits neatly into the context of the song.
#9
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it's going to be annoying at sound checks. but that's about the only disadvantage.



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#11
I generally mix the lead and rhythym parts in the sheet music so there's no arguing. So Nana would play 7 measures lead, then switch to rhythym and vice versa.
It keeps us both happy.
#12
Thats the way my band works. Sometimes i'll play lead through the whole song and then the other guy will take the solo at the end or vice versa. His strength is the soulful bluesy leads and I'm better at the faster shred type stuff. It definately makes your music more diverse splitting up leads if you're both proficient at it.
#13
Quote by richitrules
Thats the way my band works. Sometimes i'll play lead through the whole song and then the other guy will take the solo at the end or vice versa. His strength is the soulful bluesy leads and I'm better at the faster shred type stuff. It definately makes your music more diverse splitting up leads if you're both proficient at it.
Hit the nail on the head. No guitarist should limit themselves to "rhythm" or "lead".
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#14
I think there's no sense in designating rhythm and lead, but I generally play "rhythm" in that I write the main parts and the other guitarist fit around my part. I generally let the other players take solos rather than me, just because I don't think I'm much of a soloist. Its not that I can't but I'm generally playing the parts I've written and are easiest to play while singing.
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#15
Quote by slaptasticdave
I think there's no sense in designating rhythm and lead, but I generally play "rhythm" in that I write the main parts and the other guitarist fit around my part. I generally let the other players take solos rather than me, just because I don't think I'm much of a soloist. Its not that I can't but I'm generally playing the parts I've written and are easiest to play while singing.



Thats how it is almost exactly with me in my band, I usually write the "big" parts of the song and the other guitarist fits his part around mine which usually is a higher part off of mine.
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#17
Yeah, my band plays a combination of Punk and blues and one of our guitarists plays more Blues and the other is more Rock so we get two different guitar sounds that play off of each other very well.
#18
The only dilemma I can foresee is soundchecking and your live Mix. I'd suggest you guys invest in volume pedals, and switch leads.
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#19
This is my opinion, but just have two guitar parts in a song, and split accordingly. No need to get egoistic about lead and rhythm, just play the parts!
#20
That's what my band does as well. But the thing I've noticed is, I've come to know my guitarist so well that I can think "What would Phil like to play?" and I'd write a solo that he ends up loving. We just know eachothers styles well and after being in a band for so long, we've started to write our pieces like eachother, so it's like there'e one guitarist writing everything.
#21
Dont call the two guitar spots "Rhythm" and "Lead" because then the Lead player will feel superior to the rhythm, and rhyhm player inferior to the lead player. Instead, just call them guitarists. If someone writes a song and it has some lead in it, then have him play it, and vice versa. Obviously, the better player will usually become the lead guitarist naturally, but that still does not mean you have to use that word and make the other guy feel bad.
#22
two words: co-lead.

each guitarist is different and the more variety you can get out of the band,the better.
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