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#1
What songs (in any genre) do you think have the best walking bass lines???

I love the song 'All My Loving' by the Beatles...

really just looking for some new and interesting walking bass lines to learn and play....
#4
please be specific...Jazz is a very broad spectrum, with many different periods...please quote specific song titles and artists...thanks
#6
Not to be a killjoy but how about some obscure songs and not same old obvious played to death ones?...some diamonds in the ruff??? All popular tunes are off the tabe...I should have been more specific!!!!
#7
Quote by jtkguitar
Not to be a killjoy but how about some obscure songs and not same old obvious played to death ones?...some diamonds in the ruff??? All popular tunes are off the tabe...I should have been more specific!!!!

Did you check your own example? I hate to be a killjoy too, but you know The Beatles aren't exactly an unknown band, right?
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#10
Quote by sidvicious182
if you can walk like the bassist on john coltrane's giant steps then thats something to talk about.



heck yeah it is!!!
#11
"The Ocean" by Led Zeppelin has a killer walking line at the end, and is a sick song in general, but if we're going for jazz, I think Paul Chambers' performance on "So What" by Miles Davis is just a classic. He also brings out the triplets in "Freddie Freeloader", my personal favorite Kind of Blue song.
#12
all genres, rock, rockabilly, rock and roll, hard rock, jazz, blues, reggae, ska, punk, pop, r&b, motowm, country, bluegrass etc...
#13
Lucy In The Sky's chorus line is good.
Saw Her Standing There (learned last night!) is basic but fun. Not sure if they're the interesting you were looking for, but that's all i got right now. (:
Try adding more delay.
#15
Quote by jtkguitar
What songs (in any genre) do you think have the best walking bass lines???I love the song 'All My Loving' by the Beatles...
really just looking for some new and interesting walking bass lines to learn and play....


Ya know the saying.. "give a man a fish, you feed him for a day..?
Same thing with walking bass lines. You don't learn walking lines, you learn to walk.

And yeah...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kotK9FNEYU
#17
Cinderella Man - Rush - that is one hell of a bass line to keep up with!!
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#19
Quote by jtkguitar
Not to be a killjoy but how about some obscure songs and not same old obvious played to death ones?...some diamonds in the ruff??? All popular tunes are off the tabe...I should have been more specific!!!!

How about you go buy the Real Book, Bass Edition.
#20
Anything by Paul Chambers is basically Jesus' own. I see him as the best jazz bassist to live (in the end, who really cares?). So, I guess any song off of the Kind of Blue album, or countless others. To be more specific, I think the single greatest walking bassline to ever be performed, because it's not just the line, but how it interacts, is in Birdland off of the 8:30 album. Jaco is in fine form and every song they performed was probably the best version I've ever heard of it, but Birdlands walking line really is incredible. Leave it to Jaco to make a walking bassline interesting (did he? )
#21
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Anything by Paul Chambers is basically Jesus' own. I see him as the best jazz bassist to live (in the end, who really cares?). So, I guess any song off of the Kind of Blue album, or countless others. To be more specific, I think the single greatest walking bassline to ever be performed, because it's not just the line, but how it interacts, is in Birdland off of the 8:30 album. Jaco is in fine form and every song they performed was probably the best version I've ever heard of it, but Birdlands walking line really is incredible. Leave it to Jaco to make a walking bassline interesting (did he? )

So true about Paul Chambers. So What is one of the best basslines ever.
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#22
A bit cheeky but enjoy anyway
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcqqyL-Y6Go
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#23
Paul Chambers is definately someone to sit and listen to. Another song I love is Mr. PC, which Coltrane wrote about and for Paul.

I agree--rather than learn someone else walking bass line, learn how to construct your own. Its not as easy as it sounds, and it will bring in every bit of scale and chord theory to light. Its so easy to get caught in your own cliches in playing, and the ability of a good jazz bass player to break the mold and fly in a walking bass line is an admirable thing in my book.
#24
I have to say, I respectfully disagree with the "dont listen, make your own lines posts in" this thread.

Will you get to a point where its necessary to make your own lines? Yes. And if your in your schools jazz band (or plan on it) then that will come very soon. But as with any other thing in music, the best way to learn is to listen, and then transcribe. This idea of listening and transcribing is emphasized especially in jazz

Us jazzers talk about music as being a language, and ideas that people play are words. Essentially, your transcribing so that you can build your "vocabulary" and when your writing you build your ideas with this vocabulary.

So my advice? Transcribe a lot, but write a lot more
#25
Quote by tubatom868686
I have to say, I respectfully disagree with the "dont listen, make your own lines posts in" this thread.

Will you get to a point where its necessary to make your own lines? Yes. And if your in your schools jazz band (or plan on it) then that will come very soon. But as with any other thing in music, the best way to learn is to listen, and then transcribe. This idea of listening and transcribing is emphasized especially in jazz

Us jazzers talk about music as being a language, and ideas that people play are words. Essentially, your transcribing so that you can build your "vocabulary" and when your writing you build your ideas with this vocabulary.

So my advice? Transcribe a lot, but write a lot more



yeah really!!! that was the whole point of posting this, to find some new and interesting ideas that I could 'learn to walk' from...just in case 'that guy' who said "learn to walk" missed the gist of the application....I have been playing for almost 30 years and I still feel like I know very little...like 3 months worth of knowledge...really just looking to expand my vocab....thanks again for logic..agreed!!!!
#26
Here Is A Novel Idea...instead Of Adding Your Own Wisdom, (which Is Certainly Appreciated Yet Very Superfluous)..just Put The Name Of The Song, The Artist And Album...i Am Not Really Looking For Pointers Or Advice...just Some New Listening!!! Thanks
#27
I don't think transcribing a bass line is a bad thing in and of itself, but it is rather limiting and from my opinion, coming from the wrong end of the process. When you learn how to write, you learn about verbs, nouns, prepositions etc. Then you can go off and look at how the "great" authors take those elements and create art. You can copy note for note what someone like Paul Chambers plays, but if you don't know how its built musically, I'm not sure of what good its going to do you in the long run. If I copy a Salvador Dali stroke by stroke, does it make me a great painter? Not in my opinion.

Plus, I can guarantee, that most jazz bass players never ever play the same line the same twice.

And to the TS. Listen to Miles Davis. That should keep you busy for the rest of the summer. And don't double post; there's an edit button. And you might want to go back and peruse the rules thread at the top of the page.
#28
Quote by anarkee
I don't think transcribing a bass line is a bad thing in and of itself, but it is rather limiting and from my opinion, coming from the wrong end of the process. When you learn how to write, you learn about verbs, nouns, prepositions etc. Then you can go off and look at how the "great" authors take those elements and create art. You can copy note for note what someone like Paul Chambers plays, but if you don't know how its built musically, I'm not sure of what good its going to do you in the long run. If I copy a Salvador Dali stroke by stroke, does it make me a great painter? Not in my opinion.

Plus, I can guarantee, that most jazz bass players never ever play the same line the same twice.

And to the TS. Listen to Miles Davis. That should keep you busy for the rest of the summer. And don't double post; there's an edit button. And you might want to go back and peruse the rules thread at the top of the page.


Well, copying salvador dali isnt going to make you a great painter. But its going to let you in on some of the cool little nuances and ideas that are used that make what ever your copying a great piece of art. When your transcribing, your learning too.

You may disagree, but this is truly the way jazz is taught
#29
I'm not saying that isn't a valid way to learn jazz. I just think that its not an end in and of itself.

I'm going through a formal program right now in preparation for a college level program in performance and jazz theory. Yes, part of my assignment is to transcribe songs and I'm working on all the various ways "I got rhythm" has been handled by jazz bass players in the past. But to do that as an isolated exercise without knowing how to build a good walking bass line yourself is going to limit your ability to recognize why a particular artist made a certain choice or used a certain idea in creating that bass line.
#32
Quote by anarkee
So in the end, we both agree.

Actually, I enjoyed the discourse immensely!




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#33
permaban the foo. don't let him talk like that.

EDIT: I concur with Autumn Leaves in any version of the song.
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#34
Quote by the humanity
permaban the foo. don't let him talk like that.

EDIT: I concur with Autumn Leaves in any version of the song.


Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooo, I hate autumn leaves

Actually, since its been done so many times, theres some great examples of walking in it. But if you play a lot of jazz, autumn leaves and all blues sort of become your bane haha. But no reason TS cant learn from it.

Oh, Happy Go Lucky Loco, and Off Minor are good songs to get used to walking weird chords.

I highly recommend the song I Mean You as well
#35
Autumn Leaves is the bane of most Jazz students. But it does have the most common jazz progression of ii V I. So if you learn to move through Autumn Leaves, songs with the same progression (Tune Up, Blue Moon, Take the A Train, Satin Doll..etc etc) become a snap to create a decent bass line on the spot.
#36
Time Bomb by Rancid.
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#37
I don't understand the hate for Autumn Leaves, maybe because the first time I heard it was the on Bill Evans' Portrait in Jazz and it has the marvellous Scott LaFaro on it.

Anyway for a really tricky tune to walk in a confident, flowing manner look at Coltrane's tune Countdown, way more hXc than Giant Steps. For a version with a good walking bass on it check out Brad Mehldau's version. The bass kicks in after the stream of conciousness solo on most versions he's done, so don't worry if you haven't heard any walking bass within the first half of the recording.
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#38
I like Autumn Leaves. everything makes sense to me in the confines of that song. it helps one learn to understand jazz.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


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http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#39
Quote by the humanity
I like Autumn Leaves. everything makes sense to me in the confines of that song. it helps one learn to understand jazz.


Its a good learning tool. But everything gets unbearable after 1000 times of playing it
#40
Quote by jtkguitar
yeah really!!! that was the whole point of posting this, to find some new and interesting ideas that I could 'learn to walk' from...just in case 'that guy' who said "learn to walk" missed the gist of the application....I have been playing for almost 30 years and I still feel like I know very little...like 3 months worth of knowledge...really just looking to expand my vocab....thanks again for logic..agreed!!!!


No, I think I got the gist. Since I never told anyone, “learn to walk”, perhaps the gist of my post wasn’t too clear.

Give a man a fish, you’ll feed him for a day.
Teach a man to fish, he’ll feed himself for life (or sit in a boat and drink beer all day).

Copping snippets of walking lines from classic rock/pop tunes won’t take you any further then playing along with said tunes. There’s nothing wrong with that. I’m not ashamed to say that I’ve played the tunes mentioned above. But the bottom line is, learning “Aqualung”, “The Ocean” or “All My Loving” won’t teach you how to build a walking bass line. Copping jazz lines might take you a bit further, but only to a certain point.

On the other hand, learning the theory behind walking bass and chords/scales in general, would be beneficial for years to come; and possibly open up doors for playing you never thought of. Why can’t the new and interesting ideas you’re looking for come from a book that teaches you the fundamentals of building walking bass lines?

http://www.amazon.com/Building-Walking-Bass-Lines-Friedland/dp/0793542049
http://www.amazon.com/Walking-Bassics-Ed-Fuqua/dp/1883217504
http://www.amazon.com/Art-Walking-Bass-Acoustic-Electric/dp/0793580420/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1246673577&sr=1-2

On the other hand....

have been playing for almost 30 years and I still feel like I know very little...like 3 months worth of knowledge...
i Am Not Really Looking For Pointers Or Advice...just Some New Listening


Well... Cheers! Here’s to another 30!
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