#1
So I've been practicing for about a week now I think, trying to do at least 1 hour a day, but some days I got 3+. Anyways, got a few quick questions.

How long does it generally take to get good at chord changes? I've been following the justinguitar lessons and mainly practicing D,E, and A right now. Switching back and forth between D and E I can do about 47 times a minute. D and A, 27 times a minute. E and A, 29 times a minute. (as you can see A kinda slows me down).

Second, on my own I've been trying to learn Homecoming by hey monday:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/h/hey_monday/homecoming_ver4_tab.htm

I can do the intro riff pretty good, but the power chord part when I palm mute the chords it doesn't really give that nice muted striking sound. Doesn't matter how far back my palm is it just sounds really dead. Assuming my technique is right (might not be) would this most likely be due to my cheap guitar, cheap guitar strings, or cheap guitar amp?

Thanks in advanced for any answers.
#2
i dont know why youre seeing how many times a minute you can change chords. thats kind of pointless. just work on getting your chord changes as smooth and fluent as possible while sounding the most musical. work on your majors and minors and figure out what makes them major or minor in your eyes. There are many factors with how the tone of your guitar sounds. but the biggest factor is the player themself. but if you have a ****ty guitar with ****ty strings on it the tone is just going to sound even worse. throw on a piece of **** little solid state combo amp and youve got pure ****.
#3
Is your amp on clean? If it is then that's definitely why you can't get sound out of your palm muting. secondly, try only lightly resting your hand on the strings instead of setting on them. it could be the amp, but it is more likely the guitar. i wouldn't worry about though, because you're just starting and it's probably your technique, and you shouldn't get a new guitar during your first week.
And for the chord changes, it just takes time and practice, you'll get it eventually
#4
Theres really no approximated time for how long it takes for you to get good at anything on guitar. All that matters is how often and how long you do it. As for the palm muting question, it could be your technique (your palm might be digging too hard into the strings), or it could be the amp, guitar, strings. What kind of gear do you have?
#5
Quote by Kalagaraz
1.How long does it generally take to get good at chord changes? I've been following the justinguitar lessons and mainly practicing D,E, and A right now. Switching back and forth between D and E I can do about 47 times a minute. D and A, 27 times a minute. E and A, 29 times a minute. (as you can see A kinda slows me down).

2.I can do the intro riff pretty good, but the power chord part when I palm mute the chords it doesn't really give that nice muted striking sound. Doesn't matter how far back my palm is it just sounds really dead. Assuming my technique is right (might not be) would this most likely be due to my cheap guitar, cheap guitar strings, or cheap guitar amp?

1. it will differ dependending on the amount of time you practice, eventually chords will become second nature, so just keep practicing and it'll come to you

2.You may be pressing down too hard or to softly

what guitar/amp/strings are you using?
#6
Quote by 5150addict
i dont know why youre seeing how many times a minute you can change chords. thats kind of pointless. just work on getting your chord changes as smooth and fluent as possible while sounding the most musical. work on your majors and minors and figure out what makes them major or minor in your eyes. There are many factors with how the tone of your guitar sounds. but the biggest factor is the player themself. but if you have a ****ty guitar with ****ty strings on it the tone is just going to sound even worse. throw on a piece of **** little solid state combo amp and youve got pure ****.


That's what it says to do on justinguitar. To practice every day doing "1 minute changes" and keeping a log of how many you can do per minute every time you do it so you can see your improvement. It's one of the lessons series in the beginnmer sticky in this forum section.

Not sure what strings I'm using, I think I bought them at walmart when I broke the stock strings.

Guitar is a epiphone les paul special II

Amp is a peavey rage 258.
#7
Hey,

Chord Changes
I've been playing for around 2 years, and my chord changes used to be awful. Eventually you get the muscle memory down, the key is to get your fingers to jump to that shape (eg. a triangle shape for D).

Also, make sure that you don't take your fingers too far off the guitar. A mistake that many people make when first starting is to come WAY off the guitar, losing valuable time. 2 seconds per chord change is a lot of time, but you will get it with practice. Judging from the amount you have been playing, you should be able to switch in a couple weeks, keep building that finger strength, and don't get obsessed with one technique.

Palm muting
Make sure you *lightly* place your palm on the strings. There should be less pressure than the weight of your hand. Now start over the pickups, and slowly move your hand back while doing down strokes. You should hear short mutes slowly turn into short tones. Usually your hand has to be pretty far back, almost on top of the bridge.

If you still are having trouble with palm mutes, it could be due to your gear, but without actually being there, I couldn't tell you.
I wish you the best of luck, and keep at it! Try to have some fun!

*Edit*
If you have bad strings, it can really take away from the tone of the guitar, and the amount of fun you have playing it. Buy some extra slinky Ernie Ball strings, and throw them on there if you're getting dull tones. They're under 10 bucks and are preferred especially by beginners(but many people use them) because they're very easy on the fingers.
Last edited by Skyhiro at Jun 29, 2009,
#8
Quote by Skyhiro
Hey,

Chord Changes
I've been playing for around 2 years, and my chord changes used to be awful. Eventually you get the muscle memory down, the key is to get your fingers to jump to that shape (eg. a triangle shape for D).

Also, make sure that you don't take your fingers too far off the guitar. A mistake that many people make when first starting is to come WAY off the guitar, losing valuable time. 2 seconds per chord change is a lot of time, but you will get it with practice. Judging from the amount you have been playing, you should be able to switch in a couple weeks, keep building that finger strength, and don't get obsessed with one technique.

Palm muting
Make sure you *lightly* place your palm on the strings. There should be less pressure than the weight of your hand. Now start over the pickups, and slowly move your hand back while doing down strokes. You should hear short mutes slowly turn into short tones. Usually your hand has to be pretty far back, almost on top of the bridge.

If you still are having trouble with palm mutes, it could be due to your gear, but without actually being there, I couldn't tell you.

I wish you the best of luck, and keep at it! Try to have some fun!


When you practicing your chord changes, did you try and make sure all your fingers came down in correct shape at same time, or just trying to change as fast as possible? when switching from in E to a D, my first finger slides into the D position, and my 3rd finger snaps onto the 3rd fret 2nd string pretty simultanously. but my 2nd finger gets confused and has a split second of air time before it sees where to go.

EDIT: You made an edit to get extra slinky ernieball guitar strings, and I'm looking over website. Would those be nickel, titanium, reinforced or what?
Last edited by Kalagaraz at Jun 29, 2009,
#9
Quote by Kalagaraz
When you practicing your chord changes, did you try and make sure all your fingers came down in correct shape at same time, or just trying to change as fast as possible? when switching from in E to a D, my first finger slides into the D position, and my 3rd finger snaps onto the 3rd fret 2nd string pretty simultanously. but my 2nd finger gets confused and has a split second of air time before it sees where to go.

EDIT: You made an edit to get extra slinky ernieball guitar strings, and I'm looking over website. Would those be nickel, titanium, reinforced or what?


When I began practicing chord changes, my fingers would snap one by one to the strings as you said. This is natural, as you get become more comfortable, it will become all one motion, allowing you to switch more fluidly. So don't worry about it, just worry about getting your fingers to the right place as fast as possible.

I suggest the Nickel Wound, Extra Slinky Ernie Ball strings that come in the pink package.

If you want to buy them online, or see what they look like, you can see it on their vendor web site by clicking here

Once again, Good Luck.
Skyhiro
#10
Quote by Skyhiro
When I began practicing chord changes, my fingers would snap one by one to the strings as you said. This is natural, as you get become more comfortable, it will become all one motion, allowing you to switch more fluidly. So don't worry about it, just worry about getting your fingers to the right place as fast as possible.

I suggest the Nickel Wound, Extra Slinky Ernie Ball strings that come in the pink package.

If you want to buy them online, or see what they look like, you can see it on their vendor web site by clicking here

Once again, Good Luck.
Skyhiro


Alright thanks, I want to believe it's either the strings or amps that's making it sound different than the actual song. I can definitely hear the difference between my palm muting and a literally muted string, but it just doesn't give that nice distorted striking sound, just more like a less loud power chord. (I'm using distortion on amp)
#11
Quote by Kalagaraz
Alright thanks, I want to believe it's either the strings or amps that's making it sound different than the actual song. I can definitely hear the difference between my palm muting and a literally muted string, but it just doesn't give that nice distorted striking sound, just more like a less loud power chord. (I'm using distortion on amp)


Another possible is the thickness of your pick or the hardness of your stroke. If you have a flimsy pick, you wont get that nice fat power chord sound. You can get a decent sound with a medium pick, but I suggest trying heavier grade picks as well.
#12
Don't bother with palm-muting yet, concentrate on simply getting better at the chords themselves before you worry about stuff like palm-muting. It's going to take a few months before your hands to get used to the guitar and it starts feeling like it's supposed to be there...until then just concentrate on the basics.
Actually called Mark!

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#13
Quote by steven seagull
Don't bother with palm-muting yet, concentrate on simply getting better at the chords themselves before you worry about stuff like palm-muting. It's going to take a few months before your hands to get used to the guitar and it starts feeling like it's supposed to be there...until then just concentrate on the basics.


hehe alright thanks for the advice. Sometimes just get depressing that people with no arms play better than me

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3gMgK7h-BA&feature=related
#14
For the first few months I would just concentrate on smooth chord changes while keeping your strumming going. Once you have that down move onto strumming patterns. This will allow you to play alot of songs and give you a good grounding before learning other techniques like palm muting. If you can play in tune and in time with enough practice you will pick up almost anything.