#4
Man, you are way behind times. Jackson uses compound radius fingerboards, along with Fender (Not quite sure though; can anyone confirm it? I hear they use it on their newer models, doing a 10 or 11" after the 12th fret or so, for better action and such), and I think a few Ibanez models use compound radius.


Baisically all it is is a slight change in the curve of the fingerboard as you get closer to the bridge. I think Jackson has a 16" radius down around the 15th fret? Not sure. But at the start they radius the fretboard less to make chords easier (the curve goes along with your natural finger curve, as opposed to you having to **** with your hand/arm position to get your finger to press down on every string nicely)
Quote by satchgear
I tried it out in store.

Great neck, nice n light, good tuning stability. Overall a good guitar. I didn't but it cause I generally only buy guitars over a grand now.
#6
Yeah they're pretty nice. It's basically a fretboard that gets flatter as you move up the neck, making it more conventional for fast playing.
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#7
Quote by V.U.K
Man, you are way behind times. Jackson uses compound radius fingerboards, along with Fender (Not quite sure though; can anyone confirm it? I hear they use it on their newer models, doing a 10 or 11" after the 12th fret or so, for better action and such), and I think a few Ibanez models use compound radius.


Baisically all it is is a slight change in the curve of the fingerboard as you get closer to the bridge. I think Jackson has a 16" radius down around the 15th fret? Not sure. But at the start they radius the fretboard less to make chords easier (the curve goes along with your natural finger curve, as opposed to you having to **** with your hand/arm position to get your finger to press down on every string nicely)



I thought it was the opposite and flatter at the nut?
#8
Quote by Belly8
I thought it was the opposite and flatter at the nut?

No, it's more curved at the nut so it's more comfortable for chord shapes, then flatter higher up on the neck so soloing is smoother and more comfortable.
#9
Yes it prevents "fretting out" a condition that occurs with vintage radius necks ( 7-1/2 , 9-1/2 etc). Basically when you bend a string on a curved fingerboard and it moves sideways across the frets, if the curve is too much the string will actually touch the fret and kill the note (hence the name Fretting out). For Compound Radius necks, usually, the radius gradually changes as you go up the neck because most frequent string bending happens there, while it also maintains the more curved feel in the lower registers where most people chord most often!
Moving on.....
#10
i sorta like it on my jackson, i seem to have a much harder time setting up the "perfect" action on mine without any buzz, unlike a guitar with a straight radius.
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Quote by SinisterStrieth
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#11
I've got one and it's.... meh.

The problem is if you do any ascending stuff or if you're the lone guitarist playing both rhythm and lead style parts, it gets awkward in the middle. You've got to start using weird fingering to ascend up the neck properly.
And of course if you only play lead or only play rhythm then you'd be better off with a dedicated neck for that anyway.


In short, I've got a compound radius neck and I wish I'd paid the extra for a straight 9.5" or 10" fretboard instead.
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#12
Actually warmoth standard is the progressive radius they charge extra for some reason to make it a single radius.
#13
Quote by Tackleberry
Actually warmoth standard is the progressive radius they charge extra for some reason to make it a single radius.
It's just because their machines are set up normally to do the compound radius. They have to take the neck to a second machine and set that up every time someone wants a straight radius, so it takes longer and costs more.
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