#1
Hey there guys, i'm starting to rely on you guys for any questions i have haha, here is a list for you

What are the purposes of scales
Are a scales notes always the same amount of tones and semitones apart
What scales should i know for shredding
What are arpeggios used for
How can i play an arpeggio
What are intervals / what are they used for
Church modes are scales commonly used for writing music, but what are ''modes''
What is a lick
I don't understand the circle of fiths, what is it, people have tried to explain it to me and i still dont get
I want to learn how to sweep
How does one compose with theory
What are the names of all the scales a metal player and a player in general should know?

Please, could you awnser these to the best of your ability?
I need to know exactly so i can start learning.
I am going to check this thread again in the morning, haha, its almost like waking up to christmas again .
#2
Take a look at the FAQ [thread]503032[/thread] - it will answer most if not all of your questions.

Edit: Don't worry about modes for now. In fact, ignore the fact they even exist for a while. Start with the Major scale.
Last edited by zhilla at Jun 30, 2009,
#3
Scales are a combinations of notes wich fit into a chord. So you play in Am, you can play the Am-scale.

No, the big difference is between major and minor scales. You should at least learn both pentatonic (major and minor) and the Ionan and Aeolion.

Ow, can`t give you much advice here. Ask an expert or search the forums...

Intervals are the "distance" between to notes. E - G is a b3, they are used to make chords.

I thought modes are the same as scales. But church modes are Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aelion and antoher one...

A lick is a little riff in a solo. Pearl Jam - Alive solo for instance has a fast repeating lick.
------12----------
----------15p12-
14b -------------

Circle of fifths, too long to explain here.

Want to learn how to sweep? Practice!

How you compose with theory? Too long to put here

You should at least know besides the pentatonics the Ionan, Phrygian, Dorian and Aelion. But I would strongly recommed to learn them al.
#4
I'm no master at theory, in fact I'm quite terrible at it, but here goes:

1. I would assume scales are set notes in an octave that soud good together and set the mood (major = happier, minor = more mysterious or sad)

2.I believe they are the same amount of tones and semitones apart. An E minor scale is the exact same shape as an A minor scale except in a different position

3. Its good to know as many scales as possible first. But definitely pentatonic, major and minor.

4. An arpeggio arethe notes of a chord played out as seperate notes.

5. You can sweep an arpeggio, as a lot of shredders do, or theres some other ways too. just look at the chord you're arpeggiating (sp?) and figure out a comfortable way to play them.

6. An interval is the distance from on note to another. for instance: a minor 2nd is one fret away or one semitone away. major 2nd is two frets or a whole tone away. without intervals the world that is music would implode.

7. I see modes as playing a scale of one key, with the backing track in a different key. If you know which 2 different keys work, it will sound different and exotic but if not it might just sound terrible.

8. I've been kinda puzzled with that too, but as far as I know, it's just a soloing phrase. its like a riff, but for solos or lead lines

9. Circle of 5ths shows you which notes are a fifth/ fouthaway from each other. I don't have much experience with the circle of 5ths sorry

10. Sweep picking: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PC9BP5qnWtI

11. Knowing your theory helps you compose a piece that all the parts sound nice together (same key etc) although some pieces of music can sound very dissonant and still sound awesome

12. You should know at the very least: Major, Minor and Minor Pentatonic. After, try Diminished, Augmented and Foreign scales

So yeah... take what you can from that post, if I'm wrong, someone please correct me

Cheers!
#5
Quote by Cyborlox
So yeah... take what you can from that post, if I'm wrong, someone please correct me
um...

Quote by Cyborlox
7. I see modes as playing a scale of one key, with the backing track in a different key. If you know which 2 different keys work, it will sound different and exotic but if not it might just sound terrible.
Modes don't work like that - modes are derived from the major scale, and modes with the same parent scale will have the same key signature (ie the same number of sharps and flats). But don't worry about modes yet - not until you know the major scale inside out and back to front.

Quote by Cyborlox
12. You should know at the very least: Major, Minor and Minor Pentatonic. After, try Diminished, Augmented and Foreign scales
Start with the major scale - pretty much every other scale is derived from the major scale, so understanding the major scale will make all other scales relatively simple to learn and understand.
#6
I suggest you learn the very basics of theory first and have a look at "The Crusade" in the columns part of the site. This will answer almost all your questions.
#8
Quote by ShredHead396
Hey there guys, i'm starting to rely on you guys for any questions i have haha, here is a list for you

1What are the purposes of scales
2Are a scales notes always the same amount of tones and semitones apart
3What scales should i know for shredding
4What are arpeggios used for
5How can i play an arpeggio
6What are intervals / what are they used for
7Church modes are scales commonly used for writing music, but what are ''modes''
8What is a lick
9I don't understand the circle of fiths, what is it, people have tried to explain it to me and i still dont get
10I want to learn how to sweep
11How does one compose with theory
12What are the names of all the scales a metal player and a player in general should know?

Please, could you awnser these to the best of your ability?
I need to know exactly so i can start learning.
I am going to check this thread again in the morning, haha, its almost like waking up to christmas again .


I would say that you're asking for a lot on information which you should take your time over learning. I think (other people will disagree) that at the moment you need the answers to the questions 1, 5, 6 and 9

Lets start with question 6

Intervals are the relationship between one note and another. Scales are made up of intervals and chords are made up by stacking intervals. For some good advice on intervals and making chords from them look here http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_2_intervals.html

As for the intervals in scales, well, I can tell you that a major scale is composed of root, major 2nd, major 3rd, perfect 4th, perfect 5th, major 6th, major 7th, octave. So in Cmaj that is C D E F G A B C. If you didn't understand that then look at the link I posted as it explains intervals. The major scale is important to learn and understand as the vast majority of western music uses scales built from the major scale.

So learn the major scale, learn how to stack the intervals to create chords from it, and learn how to play it on the fretboard.

This brings me to question 9

To learn how to play the major scale anywhere on the fretboard you need to know what notes you should be playing. The circle of fifths basically helps you learn how many sharps or flats are in a particular major scale. Look at it. At 12 o'clock there is C. C has no sharps or flats. Going clockwise G has 1 sharp (it's major 7th interval F#). D has 2 sharps (F# and it's major 7th interval C#). etc. all the way to C# in which every note is sharp. You'll notice that (after learning about intervals) the circle moves around in perfect fifth intervals. C to G, G to D, D to A etc.

Anti-clockwise the circle moves in perfect fourth intervals C to F, F to Bb, Bb to Eb etc. C has no sharps or flats, F has one flat (it's perfect 4th interval Bb), Bb has two flats (Bb and it's perfect 4th Eb) etc.

Once you know the circle of fifths, and you know where all the notes are on the fretboard, you'll be able to play in any major scale anywhere on the fretboard.

Also, by knowing the circle of fifths you also know all the sharps and flats for all the natural minor scales as each major scale has a relative minor. Don't worry about that yet.

1 the purpose of a scale. Well, a scale can help you create a particular mood/emotion in your music. The intervals that make the scale govern this. Also scales mean you can play in key. e.g. you are in a band and you decided to jam. If you know what key you are playing in you are more likely to get something that sounds good.

5 arpeggios essentially are when you play the notes of a particular chord one after the other. A good example is the intro to Everybody Hurts by REM. once you've learnt about intervals, how to build chords, and where the notes appear on the fretboard you'll be able to make arpeggios. (if you want to sweep pick then arpeggios are necessary to understand)

Anyway. Hope that helps. If I've made any mistakes feel free to point them out
Last edited by Myshadow46_2 at Jun 30, 2009,
#9
1. All music is built from scales.
2. Different kinds of scales have different interval patterns.
3. See note at the bottom.
4. The notes from a chord played individually.
5. Find the notes of a chord on the fretboard and play them.
6. Intervals are the distance between 2 notes and are the basis of music theory.
7. A mode is very similar to a scale. You don't have enough knowledge at this point to understand them.
8. It's a just a series of notes. It's a slang term.
9. Learn theory.
10. Good for you. See note at the bottom.
11. First you have to learn some of it.
12. See note at the bottom.

Note: Alright, it seems to me that you want learn theory so you can become an amazing metal quick and make the most technically proficient and brutal stuff around. Not to squash your dreams or anything, but if it was that easy then everyone would be doing it. Most of the questions you asked are easily answered by just learning some theory. There are plenty of resources on this site, including the Crusade Articles. Only after you've read those article will you get a good answer to your last question.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#11
Quote by ShredHead396
Thank you guys, i will take everything you have said into account


Don't. A lot of it is wrong.
Read the Crusades articles in the columns section.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
Don't. A lot of it is wrong.
Read the Crusades articles in the columns section.




Don't ever stop being an ass. It's informative and hilarious.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#13
Quote by Eastwinn


Don't ever stop being an ass. It's informative and hilarious.


I actually typed up a few paragraphs answering each one of his questions, but my computer froze when I hit the submit button. I took it as a sign that God approves of my assholery.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by Archeo Avis
I actually typed up a few paragraphs answering each one of his questions, but my computer froze when I hit the submit button. I took it as a sign that God approves of my assholery.


Or maybe a sign that God wants you to use firefox.


...nah, your explanation is way better
i don't know why i feel so dry
#15
Quote by Eastwinn
Or maybe a sign that God wants you to use firefox.


...nah, your explanation is way better


I do use Firefox.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#16
Quote by Archeo Avis
I do use Firefox.


Oh, never mind then. Normally it saves the form data, but whatever.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#17
Quote by Archeo Avis
I actually typed up a few paragraphs answering each one of his questions, but my computer froze when I hit the submit button. I took it as a sign that God approves of my assholery.

mine does the same exact thing. but only when i've typed up a long, informative and mind blowing post (which is why i make so few of them)

unfortunately i have to agree w/ archeo, these posts aren't completely wrong by any means, but at the same time they're not completely right either. being that music and its theory is a combination of both math and science i'd recommend reading as much as you can and getting as entirely complete and accurate info as you can.
#18
Cheers for the help guys im going to have to get onto an actual teacher i guess, but thanks a lot for taking the time to try, to all of you, you have my thanks