#1
Hi guys.

I've owned an Epiphone Les Paul custom for about 3 and a half years now, I used to play it lots and share gigging duties about 50/50 between that and my Schecter, but in the past 12 months or so I've noticed that the intonation on the G string is wayyy off. I've tried adjusting the bridge saddles all the over the place to no avail and I can't see any noticeable bending or curvature in the neck. As well as this, the string tends to go out of tune at even the slightest bend or tough session of strumming (I've made sure to stretch the strings well) and it makes a strange creaking sound when I adjust the machine heads like it's under too much strain. The intonation problems are particularly noticeable past about the 9th fret, and when played open or low on the neck it's almost nonexistent. Very annoying when playing octave passages or power chords.

I tune to standard and use 10 - 52 Ernie Balls, but I used to experiment with different tunings and string gauges a lot a couple of years back, sometimes tuning as low as A without giving it a proper set up, and I'm pretty sure this is what's ****ed it up.

So anyway, I'm just wondering if any of you tech heads would recommend an adjustment to my truss rod? Or if not, is there some other solution to get rid of this dodgy intonation?

Thanks for your time and help, sorry about the essay!
And I said; 'I must slip out of these wet clothes and into a dry Martini'
#2
Intonation is not cured by fiddling with the truss rod. If the G is constantly losing tune there could be two reasons.
1. String not properly attached to the tuning peg. I always knot unwound strings and make sure there are 2 or 3 turns over the knot to prevent any slippage.
2. Faulty or worn out tuner.

You have to have tuning stability before you can set the intonation properly. And be sure to use a good tuner. There are many threads here describing the process of setting intonation on TOM bridges so I won't repeat all the good words from them.
I pick up my guitar and play
Just like Yesterday

T C Ellis Series 2 LP w/Skatterbrane Quiescence pups
Cort EVL-K6
Yamaha RGX211 modded
H&S Electric 12-string
Shaftsbury Ricki 4001
'84 Fender Yale
Roland Cube 15x

#3
I'm certain my tuner isn't faulty, it's the same one I use with all of my other guitars, its also of very good quality, and the string is attached securely to the peg, I'm no newbie when it comes to things like that, but this intonation problem is completely beyond me. It's consistently occurring after all string changes and the only thing I can think of would be something to do with the neck of the guitar.

Thanks for the reply though.

I would take it down to my local music shop for a set up, but they're crooked as hell.
And I said; 'I must slip out of these wet clothes and into a dry Martini'
#4
Find a decent guitar shop and drop it in for them to take a look. They may be able to tell you there and then what is wrong and how much it costs to fix.
#5
A very high action (like Epi's have from the factory) would cause the ideal setting to be beyond the range of the saddle movement and this would be most obvious on the G string.
BTW when I wrote tuner I should have made it clear I meant the machine head for that string.
Also, the creaking you mentioned would indicate a problem at the nut or with the mechanics of the tuning gear.
Just a last thought. Have you reversed the saddle on that string? I have had a guitar that would only come right with the saddle backwards on the G.
I pick up my guitar and play
Just like Yesterday

T C Ellis Series 2 LP w/Skatterbrane Quiescence pups
Cort EVL-K6
Yamaha RGX211 modded
H&S Electric 12-string
Shaftsbury Ricki 4001
'84 Fender Yale
Roland Cube 15x

#6
Ahh ok, sorry about the misunderstanding, I have a medium set action on my epi, i'm gonna try reversing the saddle, that sounds like it's worth a shot!

Thanks for the tips
And I said; 'I must slip out of these wet clothes and into a dry Martini'
#7
Quote by Lurcher
A very high action (like Epi's have from the factory) would cause the ideal setting to be beyond the range of the saddle movement and this would be most obvious on the G string.
BTW when I wrote tuner I should have made it clear I meant the machine head for that string.
Also, the creaking you mentioned would indicate a problem at the nut or with the mechanics of the tuning gear.
Just a last thought. Have you reversed the saddle on that string? I have had a guitar that would only come right with the saddle backwards on the G.



I just reversed the saddle, changed the strings, and voila, problems seem to have subsided for now.

Thanks for the help!
And I said; 'I must slip out of these wet clothes and into a dry Martini'