#1
What's up with the blues notes in scales and what are they. I feel like I was lied to for not being told about these!
#2
The way I see it (which I don't know whether or not is right) is that blue notes are notes that are out of the key, but add a bit of spice to the scale. The best example, I would say, is a dominant 7. Say you're in the key of E major, technically the notes are E F# G# A B C# D# E, but if you play a D natural, it will sound "blue" because it is out of key.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
the blues note is simply the flat 5 so if you were playing an a minor pentatonic, the flat 5 would be on the 6th fret of the a string and the 8th fret of the g string
i think a better question is, "who in the pit has had sex?"
then "with music on?"
then "more than once?"


i for one feel left out
#4
Quote by food1010
The way I see it (which I don't know whether or not is right) is that blue notes are notes that are out of the key, but add a bit of spice to the scale. The best example, I would say, is a dominant 7. Say you're in the key of E major, technically the notes are E F# G# A B C# D# E, but if you play a D natural, it will sound "blue" because it is out of key.


ya the note is out of key so its meant to create disonance but disonance is pretty cool in blues music but the flat 5 in the key of e major is b flat not d
i think a better question is, "who in the pit has had sex?"
then "with music on?"
then "more than once?"


i for one feel left out
#5
they are just notes that can add colour to what you're playing over, they are usually a semitone change in the scale.

in the case of the blues note, the flattened fifth degree of the minor scale, it give a certain stressed or dissonant feel when played over certain changes.

another common one is the raised 7th of the minor scale, which can, if used properly, give you an "eastern" feel to the music due to the step and a half jump you would make from the 6th.
#6
In E major, the blue note is G, and it's generally played a little bit sharp. In E minor, the blue note is Bb. They're both dissonant passing tones and neither is hidden in any way.