#1
My problem with live sound engineers as a guitarist is that they will fight with you for stage volume, meaning they want as little volume from your guitar amp as possible.

This wouldn't be a problem except that I am a sensible guitarist who has had experience playing with a band and I know my sound levels and what constitutes as "too loud".

For example, I was playing on stage in a situation where the engineer was adjusting my amp volume. Do you know that thing with solid state amps, that setting between 0 and 1 that you get sound out of the amp but it doesn't sound like the power amp is actually on, just a preamp, tube fuzz sound? He miked that sound at one of my gigs and it was awful.

Ever since then I vowed to use a single volume 5 watt amp through a 4x12. I turn the amp up loud enough for distortion and if the tech told me to turn it down I would explain that there is only one volume knob and that is how I get my distortion. It has worked great so far and my amp has been loud enough that the mic in front of it picks up the sound perfectly.

I cannot believe some of the bozos some clubs hire as sound guys.
"teh most gains"
#2
Perhaps they perceive the acoustics of an auditorium or room differently? What you hear onstage is not what you hear in the audience.
#3
Sound engineers just like to be in complete control of everything. If you have no sound coming out of your amp (or almost no sound) then that means that you cant really be heard in the house without their PA. Which makes them 100% in control. Which is also retarded
#4
You guys are incorrect. There is a reason they are live sound engineers and you're not. They should have 100% control because they catering to the crowd, and not the guitarist's ego. Ask for louder guitar in your monitor if you need to complain.
Quote by allislost
I would say that aetherspear speaks nothing but the truth.
UG Blues Group
UG Reggae & Dub Group
Need Professional Mixing for cheap? Need Vinyl to Digital Transfers? PM Me.
#5
I've met plenty of guitarists with terrible ears who couldn't EQ for crap and know nothing about tone or fitting in with a band...I've never met a sound engineer with that problem.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#6
Quote by aetherspear
You guys are incorrect. There is a reason they are live sound engineers and you're not. They should have 100% control because they catering to the crowd, and not the guitarist's ego. Ask for louder guitar in your monitor if you need to complain.


No they should not, exclusively, that's so elitist.

Sound engineers are supposed to make the sound good.

Thin guitar sound = not good.

If he wants 100% control of volume, and sacrifices the guitar (punch) sound for it, then it's he whose ego stands in the way.

The band has the final say.

What if you took a Da Vinci painting, and recoloured it, just because the colours would cater more to the crowd.

A good engineer should give up control, if it's in favour of the band.

He should have slanted the cabs sideways so they act as monitors, that will give him at least 30% of projected sound into the room back, and allows for more volume on the guitarist side.

perfect compromise, and done very often;

bad engineer.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jul 1, 2009,
#7
Sound engineers are bad in small location situations, as small pub, or low roof rooms, when you obviously can't turn the volume of the amp up as you normally do..

That's bad when you have a tube amp and under a certain level it does NO distortion. Big bad problem that I overcome with a Ibanez Tube Screamer..