#1
I'm currently trying to write music, and i am heavily influenced by Altitudes, does anyone have any tips?
Is using the same chord progression as Altitudes okay?
#2
i would stray far away from using the same chord progression as a different artist. I dont know who Jason Becker is or what his style is like but that would be, in my humble mind at least, plagiarism. that would be akin to using the riff from Crossroads because you like Cream. That's how i see it anyway.
PAH!
#4
hm, well, if you want to know how i write music, i sit down with my electric (or maybe the acoustic if im feeling sensitive :P ) with no tabs or lessons pulled up on the PC. Then i play what comes naturally. If i hear something i like, i'll tab it out and then keep playing. I leave the "polishing off" for later because i may be on a roll with the writing.
PAH!
#5
i'm not necessarily trying to write a totally original song, but one as a tribute i suppose, and theres a part in the song that i really really love, and it starts from 1:58 till 2:24
is there any way i can use that part into my song?
#6
i dont see any problem with a tribute/homage to a different song, as long as you don't claim you wrote said progression.
PAH!
#7
If you really want to get into writing music and you don't already know it, music theory is your best friend.
Today I feel electric grey
I hope tomorrow, neon black
#8
Quote by Ganoosh
If you really want to get into writing music and you don't already know it, music theory is your best friend.

i only know basic theory, like all the notes on the guitar, i guess some basic theory on note durations and stuff? oO
#9
Quote by Arterial
i only know basic theory, like all the notes on the guitar, i guess some basic theory on note durations and stuff? oO

I don't know how to put this without sounding "harsh" or "critical"... you are going to need A LOT more than just notes on the guitar + note durations before you can even attempt to compose something as advanced as "Altitudes". Compositions of that nature are spawned by musicians who have been immersed in creating music and studying theory for a very long time. Start by learning your basic scales, and judging by your favorite section of the song, arpeggios then you can analyze his writing techniques and try to incorporate them into your own original works (it is slightly unnerving to me that you would be willing to just take his chord progression...). To put my post into perspective (lame pun intended) don't start by trying to climb Mt. Everest, start by learning how to climb.