#1
I was just wondering if anyone else has done this or has heard of any band doing this, but first here's the situation. My band has been around since the beginning of last school year (August), we used to have a vocalist but we got rid of him because he wasn't very good. We spent most of the year searching for a new vocalist but couldn't find one. We only have one original song and don't get to practice all that much because we're all pretty busy. I'd say we have practice twice or maybe three times a month. Instead of learning covers we usually end up just jamming, but it actually sounds pretty good. We're like an experimental/metal band. My best friend whose the drummer leaves for college soon and we are all dying to play a show, yet we only have one original song. We're thinking of playing an improvised show, and I was just wondering what any of you other band folk think about this idea. Even just an open mic kinda deal would be sweet at this point
#2
I say go for it, if you're capable.
If you're not looking to just riff over the same thing over and over, it takes a sharp ear and a knowledge of keys, and what does and does not go together. I'm a huge fan of improvised playing, both performing and hearing, and you say: "...we usually end up just jamming..." As long as it doesn't sound like a muffled fart, methinks there's no reason why you shouldn't play.
#3
I'm a huge fan or improv gigging. In fact, my band always improves at least two songs when we gig. It depends a lot on the setting. We were once forced to do it in the dark. That one was a little shaky. But if everyone is skilled enough and is used to each other's playing, it shouldn't be too hard.
#5
My first thought was Colonel Claypool's Bucket of Bernie Brains. Look them up, if you don't already know who they are.
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#7
Quote by koslack
Unless you're playing for a crowd that you know enjoys jam-band style, don't do it. You will bore them to tears. I know that 'it's all about the music, man' but that type of mentality is what gets people blacklisted from clubs.

And even if it is the right crowd, you have to be seriously good musicians. I mean, with great dynamics, instrument skill and most importantly, the 'band telepathy' that enables everyone to preempt changes in the song before they happen.

If you've not got at least a year or two of solid gigging experience, you'll probably not sound anywhere near as impressive as you think.
#8
I was getting scared reading the posts. And then I came to the last two, which finally offered some sense.

The answer to any question of this variety is "How cool will your audience think it is?" When you consider that your average audience wants to drink, dance, and score with the opposite sex, then a jam band is a tough sell at best.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
I was getting scared reading the posts. And then I came to the last two, which finally offered some sense.

The answer to any question of this variety is "How cool will your audience think it is?" When you consider that your average audience wants to drink, dance, and score with the opposite sex, then a jam band is a tough sell at best.

CT


a jam band is a hard enough sell, but what hes talking about i dont know if it even constitutes that. I mean even jam bands have songs written they dont just go up there with no idea. They write the songs and just leave them open for long improvs.

sounds like a bad idea to me, but hey if your confident enough in your musical abilities and think you'll actually have people who wouldnt mind listening to you then go for it.

also its gonna take more than practicing three times a month to get to that level of playing as a band. Good Luck
Last edited by dmiwshicldply at Jul 5, 2009,
#11
My advice is not to do it in a public venue. How about a going to college party for the drummer. A private party, with a friendly audience would probably be fine. A general public gig? Quite possibly a disaster.
#12
just do it, if it doesn't work, you'll know for the future, if it works, all the better... You might never know... what I would advise you to do is prepare jam parts a little bit, and use signals to move from one to another, that way it'll be much more fun and it'll sound better...
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#14
I wouldn't do it. I really wouldn't do that as a first or second gig. It's suicicidal. It's going to be very very mediocre at best. You can't just go out to play with NO preparation whatsoever, song wise. It's fine to pick up a jam if someone pumps out a groove and everyone feels it, I've done it in concert before, with bands I've been playing with for a while. Start on a basic groove and let everyone build off it. But that's one tune, one moment of one gig filled with covers and originals.

You honestly can't go out to jam without proper preparation. It's like jazz musicians. They don't play whatever comes to mind, they agree on songs, play a melody, then improvise over set changes. I'd like to see a band with little gig experience just agree on changes on the spot, start playing together and tightly whilst one guy improvises.

Another concern would be how to actually finish songs. In a loose jam with your buddies it's easy, things just seem to die down. But in a concert you can just have the bass or guitar stop and everybody follow. It sounds and looks really unprofessional.


Get some metal covers together and write a bunch more songs. Get some gigs, play them well. Then start thinking out of the box. I was told at a jazz course I'm going to at the moment that before you start thinking outside of the box, you have to know the inside of the box really well. You have to know all the walls, the floor, the ceiling, what's inside it, before you can start working past it. Same applies here. Your band has to be really tight and experienced before you can start forgetting it all and going into a more experimental and free route.