#1
i mean, i do understand what is dissonant when hearing it most of the times but, what is it that makes an interval dissonant or not?
Seagull Entourage Mini Jumbo
#2
Dissonance is anything that creates instability in music. It's an essential part of music to make it sound interesting.

If you're a composer, I recommend you train your ear and mind to recognise dissonance so you can resolve it.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#3
to put it really simply, it's stuff that doesn't sound "right". think of a diminished 5th, or other nasty intervals.
Quote by AA00P
Listen to the man, he's Jewish.
#4
I'm not sure we even know what makes harmonies like 3rds and 5ths sound pleasant, but whatever it is it's the opposite of that. Probably something along the lines of the frequencies lining up in a certain way.
I'LL PUNCH A DONKEY IN THE STREETS OF GALWAY
Last edited by whalepudding at Jul 1, 2009,
#5
^It's got to do with frequency ratios of each note
Quote by guitarsftw
to put it really simply, it's stuff that doesn't sound "right". think of a diminished 5th, or other nasty intervals.
Dissonance doesn't necessarily sound "bad," but it isn't stable either. It just requires resolution.

Diminished fifths, for instance sound completely different if they're resolved right. You wouldn't even recognise them if you heard them in a bach song, but they're out there in your face in Black Sabbaths 'Black Sabbath'.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#6
the science behind it is the frequencies coming close but not lining up, causing a very fast pulsating sound that is pretty annoying

consonance comes from the frequencies/harmonic overtones lining up (or corresponding in some mathematical way) and creating a pleasant sound
BASSLINES TO MAKE YOUR CHEST CAVITY SHUDDER.
#8
basically:
consonant: unison,perfect 5th,octave
less consonant: major/minor 3rd,perfect 4th,maj 6th.
weird: maj 2nd,aug 5th
so dissonant: min 2nd,tritone,min/maj 7.

at least thats how i`d classify those intervals.
#9
The simpler an interval frequency ratio is, the more consonant it sounds.

Unison = 1:1
Octave = 2:1
Fifth = 3:2
Fourth = 4:3
Maj 3rd = 5:4
Min 3rd = 6:5
Maj 2nd = 9:8
Min 2nd = 16:15

Though because of the compromises equal-tempered tuning makes, none of these besides octave and unison are perfectly accurate. The rest are off by at least a few cents.

The equal-tempered major 3rd, for example, is 400 cents; whereas its harmonic counterpart (5:4) is 386 cents.
Last edited by blue_strat at Jul 1, 2009,
#10
A great deal of sound in nature since beginning of time is created by standing waves, which can be described by harmonic series in mathematics. The harmonic series dictate that the intervals you hear when something vibrates (string, column of air, etc.) are, in order of decreasing intensity: the fundamental, the octave, the perfect fifth, the perfect fourth, the major third, the minor third, something between minor third and major second, major second and it goes on to infinity in math in practice it's limited by the medium creating/propagating the wave.

Notice that the strongest intervals are what we consider "pleasing" or consonant - through evolution the ear was accustomed to this because it's universal in nature and otherwise we'd go nuts. Just like eye is pleased by blue skies and green grass - it's everywhere.

In a nutshell, nature programmed you to sense consonance/dissonance, and that characteristic is captured by musical intervals in theory.
Last edited by KingStill at Jul 1, 2009,
#11
To provide probably the easiest to think about example in this thread.

Think of someone playing C, C#, and D all at once.
#12
Consonance occurs between notes, with coincidental overtones. Dissonance occurs between notes with unique overtones. The two terms are opposite ends of a continuum.
#13
Quote by isaac_bandits
Consonance occurs between notes, with coincidental overtones. Dissonance occurs between notes with unique overtones. The two terms are opposite ends of a continuum.



that made me think of a question. What interval would be the closest to neutral as far as consonance and dissonance goes?
#14
Quote by The4thHorsemen
that made me think of a question. What interval would be the closest to neutral as far as consonance and dissonance goes?
The way alot of composers compose today is that intervals are either consonant or dissonant. Practically, there's no neutral.

If I had to guess, it would be fourths. Depending on the situation, fourths are either consonant or dissonant.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#15
dissonance is when the notes clash with each other and make a rough sound and i remember if you go up by a seventh interval it has that dissonant sound to it
Gotta keep my eyes from the circling skies...
tounge tied and twisted just an earth bound misfit...

>CRYPTIC METAPHOR<


Quote by ilikepirates
ilikeyou.

not hated