#4
They're EXACTLY the same as the major scale.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
Quote by steven seagull
They're EXACTLY the same as the major scale.
This. The notes are exactly the same as the 'parent' major scale, its the tonal centre that different.
#7
You don't need a specific diagram for Dorian, it's exactly the same as the major scale.
Actually called Mark!

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#8
Quote by steven seagull
You don't need a specific diagram for Dorian, it's exactly the same as the major scale.


^-- Exactly right

If for example you want to play A Dorian, simply play all the scales you know for G major, except start on the A note and not the G note. Dorian is the second mode of any major scale, and A is the second note of the G major scale.

But why are you only asking for 5 shapes? There are 7.
#10
Dorian mode is one of the modes of the major scale. Do you understand how the natural minor is related to the major scale? Dorian mode is related it it in the same way - but where the tonic of the natural minor is the 6th of its relative major scale, the tonic of the dorian mode is the 2nd of its parent major scale.
#11
Quote by GirlGerms
I'm very confused, my guitar teacher has never taught me any theory. He just told me to learn the 5 shapes of the minor pentatonic, major scale (which I've done) and dorian.


Pentatonic has 5 shapes but those other scales have 7 shapes

ok, here is G major scale

E||----------------------------2-3--||
B||------------------------3-5------||
G||------------------2-4-5----------||
D||------------2-4-5----------------||
A||------2-3-5----------------------||
E||--3-5----------------------------||


Here is A Dorian

E||--------------------------2-3-5--||
B||----------------------3-5--------||
G||----------------2-4-5------------||
D||----------2-4-5------------------||
A||----2-3-5------------------------||
E||--5------------------------------||


Notice the only difference is that they start and end on a different note, the shape itself is identical. This means if you know your 7 major scale shapes, you also know the shapes for every single one of the modes. I realize that's probably extremely confusing, but anything modal tends to confused the hell out of people for a very long time.

Here's the most important thing you can know about modes. It has absolutely nothing to do with shapes. NOTHING. It's got more to do with the chord that's being played behind it, and which note you're resolving to.

The best way I can explain it is like this

First, let's take an A minor scale that's this one here:

E||------------------------------5--||
B||------------------------5-6-8----||
G||------------------4-5-7----------||
D||--------------5-7----------------||
A||--------5-7-8--------------------||
E||--5-7-8--------------------------||


Then play the following three runs, make sure you hit the open note at the beginning of each run hard enough that it keeps ringing while you play the rest of the notes. Notice that each of the three patterns fit within the Am scale posted above.

E||------------------5----------|-----------------------------|
B||------------5-6-8------------|------------------5----------|
G||------4-5-7------------------|------------4-5-7------------|
D||----7------------------------|--------5-7------------------|
A||--0--------------------------|----7-8----------------------|
E||-----------------------------|--0--------------------------|


  S S S S S S S S  E  Q    E    
------------5-7-8-10----------||
------5-6-8-------------------||
----7-------------------------||
--0---------------------------||
------------------------------||
------------------------------||


Notice how they all sound quite a bit different, even though you're playing the same notes from the same shape? Well that's the modes for you. The first run was your basic A minor. The second was E Phrygian, and the third was D Dorian.

I could get into the hows and whys, but that would take a great deal more typing than I've already done, and to be honest if you've just learned you're pentatonic shapes, you're still quite a ways away from any kind of modal stuff. Still hopefully those examples can give you something to look forwards to.