#1
I am now 16, the summer before my Senior year of high school, 1 and a half years into my band, but at the great crossroads of my life. I have to choose if I want to go to school - for music - or simply rough it out, deal with the immense hardships of attempting to become a popular functioning rock unit. Nobody said either choices are easy- my family doesn't have alot of money so I'll be paying student loans till i'm 50- and if i were to chose the other path- i would have to be networking like a madman, tourning nearly constantly and moving at a way of motion that my body might collapse from exhaustion. The good thing is when I'm doing something I love - I have immesurable drive- when it comes to school I get Bs mostly, As only in Art and Music- simply based on the principle of my interest, and I for a fact know I wont be using advanced calculus in my everyday life- statistics maybe... but beside the point- I am at a bind here guys.

and I know you have heard it a million times- but Music is pretty much what keeps me alive in the morning- my outlet, my exrpession, my whole life. I feel no greater satisfaction than when I'm on a stage having a sexual seizure of musical insanity.

The road to glory will include me having to pay out the ass for a great lawyer/agent to get my music into the mix- but of course we need some press first.

Are there any suggestions you guys can give on what I should do?

(If anyone has inquiries about my work- please check the myspace link in my profile for some rough mixes)
#2
I never took any music courses at college, but last time I checked I thought it was mainly for band/orchestra type musicians. And why can't you do both?
#5
Quote by CDubDSP
I never took any music courses at college, but last time I checked I thought it was mainly for band/orchestra type musicians. And why can't you do both?

Theres guitar programs, bass programs, percussion programs, piano programs, at most colleges that offer music. Several even have programs related to music production and recording.

But, yes, I don't see why you don't do both.
#6
Well the reason I say I can't do both is kind of simple yet hard to explain.

A musician needs an aura of dedication so powerful- they have to be touring as often as possible, making music and contacts 24/7 and the immense financial difficulties in the early years of a career are immesurable - put student loans on top of that and I have a ****storm of money that I'll need to pay. and In this Economy- thats really bad. Really bad.

I was considering trying to get into NYU's Tisch school of recorded music- it functions as a music business/production/and recording school as part of thier larger variety of programs. I was perhaps thinking I would have acess to more tools and a studio whilst attempting to hit the bigtime. Alot of people frown upon major labels in this thread I know- however, we must ask how many have actually been on major labels? It takes a good lawyer/agent to negotiate a great contract for that...

It's a very hard descision to make.
#7
Both are not mutually exclusive. Plenty of schools (particularly small university programs-- not places like NEC or juliard) are generous with merit scholarships and financial aid, and if your really good you'll be able to get a scholarship at a bigger school. The other thing to think of is, unless you have a touring deal or a contract inked, or it seems like your about to college is a safer bet while you still trying to 'make it' with your band, as even though its music school, you have a college degree which will look good for employers. Ive also listened to your recordings and, while there good you could go alot farther with your playing.
#8
I went through the same dilemma, but I decided that i'd get an associates degree in audio engineering/recording technology, then try and make it. Like you said, those would be valuable skills, plus you'd have access to your school's recording studio.
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#9
nobody says you can't take a year off, try and make it big full time and if that doesn't work, go back to school...
My Guitars:
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Amps:
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Old beaten up Peavey cab
Marshall MG30DFX
#10
That is one fine rationalization, especially the part about paying back student loans until you're fifty. If you live in the US, you don't need to pay back loans!
The road to glory will include me having to pay out the ass for a great lawyer/agent to get my music into the mix- but of course we need some press first.

It takes a good lawyer/agent to negotiate a great contract for that

You seem somewhat interested in contracts & negotiation. Perhaps you should persue that path. You asknowledge the fact that there is serious money to be made in that area, it's 'connected' to your preferred industry/career.
#11
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Well, work now promoting your band. Because what happens if that fails? What if your band doesn't get big enough for you to make money? What if your band mates go to college?

Promote now and see how far you can get, and than judge if it's enough to ensure you can make some $$$ or if you are just gonna be chasing it away, or w/e
#13
Quote by Bluestribute
Well, work now promoting your band. Because what happens if that fails? What if your band doesn't get big enough for you to make money? What if your band mates go to college?

Promote now and see how far you can get, and than judge if it's enough to ensure you can make some $$$ or if you are just gonna be chasing it away, or w/e


The contemplation of a Fall back directly correlates to the idea that the pursuit of a dream may be flawed and useless.

I think I did realize what I want to do though.
I would like to go to a School which specializes in EXACTLY what I want - I'm really eyeing NYU'S Tisch School - Clive Davis Recording school, which specializes in production,marketting, promotion, and engineering.
I want to go to a school where I can learn WHAT I want to learn and not just putz around in some liberal arts college and waste 20000 a year getting nothing important done.
It is important for my education to directly correlate with my goals, becuase otherwise i'll end up paying all these loans and **** for nothing.

If I cannot go to school where I want to learn, I'm going into a van tryign to play wedding gigs whilst still trying to make it and eat ramon noodles for 2 years. An artist must struggle, fight and do whatever is necessary. The question is, If nobody fights for the dream- who will?
#14
I think I will just go to normal college and try and start a band there
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#15
Just listened to your band and id say defo go to college and do a music course or something. The chances of you making it in the music buisness are a million to one. Think how many other bands are out there wanting to get signed too. At least when you finish college you can carry on with the band thing.
#16
Quote by griffRG7321
Just listened to your band and id say defo go to college and do a music course or something. The chances of you making it in the music buisness are a million to one. Think how many other bands are out there wanting to get signed too. At least when you finish college you can carry on with the band thing.


There are a million other bands who want to get signed. But do they have the proper ins and outs? the connections? a good agent? good press? good music? there are so many variables
#17
If you want to you should be able to make a shedload of useful contacts at college that will help you achieve your goals, and the college should be able to provide you with opportunites you may not get elsewhere. Plus you'll meet loads of like-minded people.
#18
yes, even if your NOT studying anything music related. After college you will still be young enough to persue the dream, if nothing comes your way whilst your there
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#19
The word 'dream' implies something which exists outside of reality. Pursuit of something that does not exist (assuming we exist in reality) appears to be useless.
#20
What will you learn at college that will help you with this goal? To be a better player? Not that necessary, really. Theory? Theory doesn't matter if you can already write (or hook up with someone who can write) great songs. Connections? Not as much as you'll make slugging it out in the real world and building them up yourself.

If you want to make it, as in the conventional 'get signed' thing - college will NOT help you. It will distract you. Read those posts/threads that I linked to. Move to LA or NY or London or wherever the music biz is happening, and get in there. The main ingredients are great songs and connections and image. Invest in looking like a rock star. Meet the industry people by living in a music biz center, and get known enough such that you will meet people who are great songwriters and who have great marketability. Learn how to be a great songwriter yourself. You won't learn that in college. You'll learn that by hooking up with other great songwriters and writing with them and getting their feedback. You'll learn that by practicing the craft yourself and listening - *really* listening - to how other great songwriters do it. Make sure you sound current.

College won't help you with any of that. College will put you in a non-music biz city where you will focus on academia, come out with a job ticket, meet a girl, and pursue a conventional career.

Just be prepared. At the very best, you DO know that this is a gamble that could go very badly. You may well find yourself on the crappy end of a neverending string of "I told ya so's" from people who wanted you to go to college and get a real job.

Seriously.... if getting signed is what you want to do.... there is only one option. Do those things that will help you get signed.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
so to summarize:

1. Go to liberal arts college and waste $20k per year and get nothing important done.
2. Move to city, spend $20k year striving for fame & glory as a rock star.

If I were funding one of the options, I'd chose the first.
#22
Ok. Lots of replies

Tagyoureit- i simply assume you are a realist, nothing wrong with that. I understand the immense implications of being a struggling artist. But I refuse to spend my life at a desk job doing something I know I will not like. In no manner of pretentiousness do I say this, but Art, Music, and Writing are my life. I dont function well in systematic environments which I do not have a creative voice. Although the industry is a huge part of the music business, the element of expression into a greater public medium is what keeps me going

I have been playing music since I was 5. I decided a long time ago that this is what I have to do with my life.
#23
Quote by axemanchris
What will you learn at college that will help you with this goal? To be a better player? Not that necessary, really. Theory? Theory doesn't matter if you can already write (or hook up with someone who can write) great songs. Connections? Not as much as you'll make slugging it out in the real world and building them up yourself.

If you want to make it, as in the conventional 'get signed' thing - college will NOT help you. It will distract you. Read those posts/threads that I linked to. Move to LA or NY or London or wherever the music biz is happening, and get in there. The main ingredients are great songs and connections and image. Invest in looking like a rock star. Meet the industry people by living in a music biz center, and get known enough such that you will meet people who are great songwriters and who have great marketability. Learn how to be a great songwriter yourself. You won't learn that in college. You'll learn that by hooking up with other great songwriters and writing with them and getting their feedback. You'll learn that by practicing the craft yourself and listening - *really* listening - to how other great songwriters do it. Make sure you sound current.

College won't help you with any of that. College will put you in a non-music biz city where you will focus on academia, come out with a job ticket, meet a girl, and pursue a conventional career.

Just be prepared. At the very best, you DO know that this is a gamble that could go very badly. You may well find yourself on the crappy end of a neverending string of "I told ya so's" from people who wanted you to go to college and get a real job.

Seriously.... if getting signed is what you want to do.... there is only one option. Do those things that will help you get signed.

CT



If I could give you money for a post, I would.

To everyone who is talking about the risks and how there are a million other bands who want to get signed, etc., **** you. I say that with every fiber in my being. **** you. Cowards will never make the history books, and I can tell you right now that unless you change the way you view things, you will never make it as a musician. Success is a choice, not a coin flip. It's not like successful bands just stumble into it, as you seem to think.

Highwaytohell, go for it. Rough it out. It's been done before by people who have made it. College WILL waste your time and distract you. **** fallback plans. They imply that you will give up/fail. Learn everything you can, and apply yourself completely to your craft. You certainly have the right viewpoint to make it and you are willing to work for it, from what I can tell.

I hope this helps.
#24
I am in sort of the same situation as you. Except I live in a small town so I never found any musicians I got along with or had the same tastes as me. So I am going to a junior college to get my AA in Music while saving up funds then moving out to a big city to pursue a band and/or another college. I personally always feel that i'm not good enough for a band yet so I don't mind spending 2 years learning much more about my instrument.
#25
The other problem is ... Parents. My parents will most likely force me to go to school
Personally I feel it should be my descision. I have no problem moving out of the house and getting a garbage appartment in the bronx ( I live about 1 hour from NYC) but supporting myself is all I want to worry about in there- I must require some kind of income flow- a website or whatever... there are so many variables

I think I will either way- Apply to college. Defer school for a year. than If i **** up too much in the following year I still have the option, I have the ability to fight for whatever necessary to achieve my dreams.
Last edited by Highwaytohell at Jul 2, 2009,
#26
A year out sounds like a good plan to me. It keeps all your options open. Your parents would probably go for that too if you can convince them you plan on going to college at the end of the year. If you are already a famous rockstar by the end of the year, then I'm pretty sure they will accept that as a feasible alternative to college
#27
I'm thinking the same thing. Im 17 and like you I'm in a band. Next summer however it will all be over as we will spilt up and move away for university. I unlike the other band members will being doing a university course in comercial music hopefully, which involves a year of both preformance and production after which i specialise in either field of music. In the next year however, our band is going to work really hard getting songs down, and pushing it out in the chance that we end up near each other later. If not, I will have learnt some lessons that I can take and invest into my band at uni. So my point is, why not do both, it would make sense to study music if your good at it and love it. At the same time you will most definitly pick up some great lessons that will help you on your way to music materpieces.

Niall
#28
aight - it's going to be hard- but I will attempt to convince my parents that i'm taking a year off, getting a low-paying job in the city (NYC) and roughing it out there. I will see if I can handle the rigors of that. and If not I can just defer college till the next year. easy
#29
Chances are, though, it will take you more than a year to make it. What if, in a year from now, you're playing in some band that is gigging at small to medium-sized clubs and are working on a CD?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#30
I'm actually starting to make the money for our December self-released debut album. Writing and Recording music is the easy part. It's getting the gigs and the fans that is the hard part.

Either way I just need to see if I have the ability to take the world on like that. Lets be honest. I'm 16- I've talked to alot of my musical mentors (my engineers, my teachers,etc etc) it's not going to be 5 years before I can go anywhere. I think I will find what is right if I simply go for the gold and never stop looking - however- I know that it will be a better move for me to go strike it on my own before engaging myself in a place like college where I could meet someone, get distracted, and lose focus. I feel that if i'm going to school, it's gotta be fore something I find helpful.

A degree in music business and recording and access to a recording studio whenever I want for 4 years sounds promising.
#31
Knowing the business end of things is always useful. The recording end... as long as you're not thinking that maybe you'll get a job in a recording studio or something, then you'll come out of there with some useful stuff.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#32
Quote by axemanchris
Knowing the business end of things is always useful. The recording end... as long as you're not thinking that maybe you'll get a job in a recording studio or something, then you'll come out of there with some useful stuff.

CT


I just would like to get a grip on recording interfaces and make use of the tools given so I know where to go- The scarcity of studio jobs makes it more of a skill than a carear choice. IF i wanted to be an engineer- i'd be interning at a studio right now. -

But damn chris thanks for the help man- i really need it
Last edited by Highwaytohell at Jul 4, 2009,
#33
have a look at techmusicschools.co.uk
i'm a student there, and its my job to tell people about it etc
if you want to know anything about it just ask. Its part of london college of music and renowned as the best contemporary music school in europe.
#34
Earning a life as a musician can be tough but if this is what you want to do, do it.
You can enrol into college whenever you want. And even if you fail, at least you tried and you won't regret all your life not trying. As says weigh the pros and cons and go for it. Live yur life and do the thinking when you are old.
#35
Quote by TessaEdin
Earning a life as a musician can be tough but if this is what you want to do, do it.
You can enrol into college whenever you want. And even if you fail, at least you tried and you won't regret all your life not trying. As says weigh the pros and cons and go for it. Live yur life and do the thinking when you are old.



Seeing as how this thread is almost 7 years old, I'd say the guy is no longer 16, no longer thinking about college, no longer thinking about taking a year off to move to new york and is probably working in an office somewhere or doing customer support.

Although to be fair I'd love to hear how this turned out

EDIT1: How do people find these threads?
Edit2: It's OP's birthday today, how fucked up is that?
Last edited by flexiblemile at Dec 11, 2015,
#36
I left college just before the end of my fourth semester to go with a band that was doing a 3 month tour across the US opening for other acts and filling in with clubs on off days. This band already had a deal with Mercury Records and was poised to do an album after the tour. To make a long story short the album never happened (it was recorded but not released), the band broke up within a year and I was left with no money, no immediate future and a pile of personal expenses that took a long time to pay off.
Leaving school just short of my two year degree was the biggest mistake I ever made. Get a degree first. The music will wait. You are also tying your future to other musicians. That alone is a bad dream. Take courses in business and minor in music. The business courses will be more important than the music courses once you are a working band.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Dec 11, 2015,