#1
I walked into Guitar Center the other day and tried out this guitar and thought the sound was absolutely heavenly. So now I've pretty much set my sights on that guitar once I earn enough money. Before I completely settle on it, though, I wanted to get an idea as to how much different a guitar like this is from a regular acoustic. So if anybody has any tips as far as how to play one (if it's any different from a regular acoustic ) or how to care for one, or any resonator-specific lingo, etc. theeenks!
If man is 5, if man is 5, if man is 5,
then the Devil is 6, then the Devil is 6, then the Devil is 6, the Devil is 6,
And if the Devil is 6,

then God is 7, then God is 7, then God is 7
This monkey's gone to heaven.
#2
I love resonators...alas I don't have the money to buy one . Anyway, they sound better with heavier strings in my opinion, so try to keep the strings on the larger side. I like the heavier gauge strings because the thing with resonators is that their tone is really thin and tinny, which many people like, but sometimes it can be _too_ tinny and get sort of annoying, so with thicker strings it beefs up the tone some.

Also, realize that they can get much louder than other acoustics. I know this may seem like common knowledge, but I think that while people realize they are louder, they don't realize just how loud they can get. With good heavy strings and a sharp attack, most resonators are LOUD, and can often be heard around your entire house. I only mention it because I don't know how old you are, and if you are one of the "jam in your bedroom" kids (read: me :P) then it could easily get on your parents nerves.

I don't know too much about care and maintenance, which is bad because I am trying to make that my living, so I'll research that and get back to you.

One last thing is, there are different types of resonators. The one you tried out (according to your link) is a biscuit style resonator. Try out a tricone resonator as well, they sound different but are similar...try both styles out before you decide on one. Tricones are bigger sounding with more overtones, so while they do sound metallic, they don't sound tinny like biscuits do (usually.) Go back to your guitar center and ask to see all their resonators and mess around with them.
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#3
^That was very helpful, thanks a lot.
But what exactly is a tricone?
If man is 5, if man is 5, if man is 5,
then the Devil is 6, then the Devil is 6, then the Devil is 6, the Devil is 6,
And if the Devil is 6,

then God is 7, then God is 7, then God is 7
This monkey's gone to heaven.
#4
Quote by theking182
^That was very helpful, thanks a lot.
But what exactly is a tricone?


i think the 1 big huge one, then the 2 small ones where those f-holes are.

also have you checked out the wechter line of Resonators?

http://www.sweetwater.com/guitargallery/acoustic/all/s0152920823/

the one in the picture is the square neck dobro style, using one of those pedal steel slides sense the action is ment to be VERY VERY VERY high!

im eying one of them, but cant afford it yet:P
#5
Ok, I see.

Yeah, i saw the high E string in the picture and was like, wtf? but then I read the rest of your post and i get it now. lol.

One more thing: the specs for that Chrome G say Engraved Chrome Body, and also Steel top, back, and sides.
So, is the body made of chrome, or steel??
May be a noobish question, but that's something that I've just never picked up on
If man is 5, if man is 5, if man is 5,
then the Devil is 6, then the Devil is 6, then the Devil is 6, the Devil is 6,
And if the Devil is 6,

then God is 7, then God is 7, then God is 7
This monkey's gone to heaven.
#6
Quote by theking182
Ok, I see.

Yeah, i saw the high E string in the picture and was like, wtf? but then I read the rest of your post and i get it now. lol.

One more thing: the specs for that Chrome G say Engraved Chrome Body, and also Steel top, back, and sides.
So, is the body made of chrome, or steel??
May be a noobish question, but that's something that I've just never picked up on


maybe the body is steel, but plated in crome? sort of like a regular guitar finish, but instead of transparent gloss its crome or something...just a guess though. did you try any that werent made from metal? might be useful to get a feel for different types of resonators.
#7
All I know about them is they are commonly played in blues music, and the guy from the Kinks plays one and they sound really good with a slide... I know for a fact, this did not help... lol
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It costs like ten dollars a gram
#8
The Dean resontaors are chrome plated steel - so are more harsh sounding than the brass bodied Nationals they replicate. If it says chrome it'll always be plated brass or steel. I have a Dean resonator, but mine is the one with no engraving or pickup. A new cone can work wonders on the tone of them, but I love mine as it is atm (plus the fact that I can't justify spending that much on it for an improvement in tone of that magnitude...). If you like the sound, then go for it. I leave mine in an open tuning, and I use it for slide and fingerpicking songs alike.
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#9
Has anyone got any experience and/or feedback about the Baton Rouge Vintage Tricone Resonator... I'm hooked on its awesome looks and sound but am struggling to find user feedback about its quality. Any advice or help appreciated. Thanks. SD
#10
Quote by theking182

One more thing: the specs for that Chrome G say Engraved Chrome Body, and also Steel top, back, and sides.
So, is the body made of chrome, or steel??
May be a noobish question, but that's something that I've just never picked up on
The chrome has to be merely plating. Chrome and nickel are two metals which don't oxidize to any great extent. Hence both of those metal are important alloying materials when making stainless steel. Vanadium and titanium being two others.

Mark Knopfler has at least one National resonator. He doesn't use it terrible often, but you're hear it on "Belladonna". Del Amitri also use a resonator./ You'll hear that on their, "Change Everything" album. "Be My Downfall" is the track.
#11
There are a number of different styles. You have metal bodies, and wooden bodies. Most of the wood ones are classified as "dobro" guitars and tend to be played "lap style" with a steel as in bluegrass. They often have square necks.
The metal-bodied ones also come square-neck or round neck and are as noted popular for blues playing, especially delta-style blues in open tunings.
You also have single-resonator models and models with 3 smaller resonators and a "spider" bridge which activates all of them.
There are models with built-in pickups as well.

Bob Brozman, who used steel-bodied National instruments exclusively, recommended using a mic....Even recommending a specific mic for these instruments. (His website is still up as far as I know)

It's quite possible to play a resonator in standard fashion without a slide, but you may have to fiddle with the action...Most are set up with a rather high action (and heavy strings) for slide playing.
#13
This thread is over six years old, but never mind...

Tricones are are good compromise between the nasal whine of dobro/spider type resos and the banjo-like attack of biscuit cones, and are IMO the most versatile of the various types. Mine, a brass Beltona, is set up for both slide and fingerpicking, and I installed magnetic pickups in resos, preferring them to piezos.

SD, I wold likely take a chance on it. The main risk, as with many resos, is in the neck angle, unsuitable for a low action. Cones can always be upgraded, like elctric guitar pickups.