#1
Quick easy demo solution...

We decided to take a laptop into our practice room today, along with one of these:



We simply stuck it in one corner of the tiny room on a spare mic stand, and left it running for three hours.


The room came with a really poor practice PA, but everything else came out sounding great.
You can hear a sample in my profile - I've added a little master bus reverb and compression to remove the 'small room' feel, and I reckon it sounds great (except the vocals, but that was the PA to blame).

The laptop we already owned, and I bought the mic for £50 - so that's pretty much the total. A pair of mics in stereo would be even better, but I'm very surprised at the quality of the results - we're going to redo about 5 tracks using a good PA and use them as our main demo for covers workl.

Hope this little tip helps a few of you guys out!
#3
Sounds decent for a rehearsal recording. Now, it depends on what kind of demo you're looking to make. For listening back to a rehearsal to get a more objective listen, that's awesome. For a demo to send to a club, might be okay. For a demo to send to a label, it depends on if they want 'broadcast quality' or not. This is far from broadcast quality.

Demos can be used for so many things.

I did find it a bit funny though that you're labeling the idea of recording a rehearsal with a $50 mic as a 'protip.'

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Quote by axemanchris
Sounds decent for a rehearsal recording. Now, it depends on what kind of demo you're looking to make. For listening back to a rehearsal to get a more objective listen, that's awesome. For a demo to send to a club, might be okay. For a demo to send to a label, it depends on if they want 'broadcast quality' or not. This is far from broadcast quality.

Demos can be used for so many things.

I did find it a bit funny though that you're labeling the idea of recording a rehearsal with a $50 mic as a 'protip.'

CT


'Protip' is a long-runnning joke that usually involves stating the obvious and packaging it as if it's insider advice. This is where it started:





My point was really to highlight the fact that if you need a demo to send to pubs/clubs for gigging (especially on the covers circuit) recording a rehearsal is an option worth exploring.
I'm going to add some vocal overdubs and guitar solos later (still using just that one mic), and I reckon it should produce very usable results.

Apart from anything else, live recordings will show a venue owner how your band will really sound, whereas any band can produce a high quality, well-mixed studio track, then turn up to the gig and be sloppy, out-of-tune and lacking stage presence.
#5
Not bad, it also helps that your band is very tight, especially your drummer. It's often said that a good band with crappy gear will still sound like a good band.
#6
Quote by take_it_t
Not bad, it also helps that your band is very tight, especially your drummer. It's often said that a good band with crappy gear will still sound like a good band.

Yeah, I agree. Vocals were way too quiet though.
#7
Just added the track with fully overdubbed vocals to my profile.


They're intentionally mixed low to keep the 'live' feel and are lightly treated with a little slapback and some multiband compression.
Singing was through the same Samson mic, on my desk in a specially-built K'nex shockmount
If the vocals sound a bit odd, that's because there's also still quiet singing from the rehearsal which, obviously, can't be removed.

We're going to take the mic to another practice session tomorrow, and will intentionally leave the songs without vocals to make overdubs blend more easily. Will no doubt be posting the results!

#8
OR take lessons from a dude who has a recording studio and all that equipment. That seems to work out well.
#9
Quote by Bluestribute
OR take lessons from a dude who has a recording studio and all that equipment. That seems to work out well.

Damn right. We've had plenty of free studio time from mates who're studying Sound Engineering in Uni. Even if they're not particularly good at production, you can usually acquire the master tracks to mix at your leisure.
#10
Quote by kyle62
Damn right. We've had plenty of free studio time from mates who're studying Sound Engineering in Uni. Even if they're not particularly good at production, you can usually acquire the master tracks to mix at your leisure.

Well, not our leisure. But it's $110 for 45 minute lesson once a week ($110 for a month) so we have that time, plus I have an hour and thirty minutes of unused free time, and since I'm such a good student, I can most likely go in for like 2 hours of recording for maybe like 10-20 bucks
#11
Quote by Bluestribute
Well, not our leisure. But it's $110 for 45 minute lesson once a week ($110 for a month) so we have that time, plus I have an hour and thirty minutes of unused free time, and since I'm such a good student, I can most likely go in for like 2 hours of recording for maybe like 10-20 bucks

Great deal - got any samples? Seems to make a lot of sense, I don't know of private teaching here though.


Since I started this thread with an aim to providing affordable recording ideas, here's a way to do a shockmount/pop shield on the cheap:



The little yellow lever on the top left adjusts the angle of the pop filter, which is of course an old pair of tights...

#12
Nah, took down all the samples because the songs were crappy. Though he has Sonar 7 with a big old set up, keyboards, electronic drum kit, all that stuff
#13
I've got one of these and they are actually really good.

My home set up is that, drums by my dr880 and I can either mike amps or use my gt 10's usb port and go straight onto my mac.

Awesome.


I think I have natural talent for guitar because I'm left handed and I use that hand to pleasure myself. Seeing as I started playing after most of intense masturbating-teen years, the dexterity was already there.
#14
That shock mount is about the most ghetto thing I've ever seen. That's pretty ingenious. I have a regular shock mount, but I might build one of those just 'cause it's cool.
"There is no hell. There is only France." - Frank Zappa
#15
I just got two mic stands in the mail today, and have one mic, so this one might take up the other mic stand.

What's it called? It sounds like it gets great quality.
#16
Quote by Alex Vik
What's it called? It sounds like it gets great quality.


Samson C01U. It's one of the first generation of USB mics though, so you might be able to get better for the price now.