#1
I searched, and found nothing about this topic. Thought I probably just fail at search.

I thought there should be a thread on what affects the sound coming from an amplifier other than gear. Like, how different will an amplifier sound in different rooms with diferent acoustics.

For example, where should one record?
Where should the mic be set up for recording?
Will the tone of an amp be significantly different in a church than in a small room with three walls?
Why does the tone seem to change slightly when facing the amp directly, to moving to a different part of the room while still facing it?
How different is the sound of a 100watt at volume 2, to one at volume 7? (like, how is the tone better in the later? ex: creamier, less "icepicky")
Also stuff like feedback.

Dunno, thought these are good questions to be answered, as well as a place to make good suggestions for amp placements in homes and on stage and the like.
#2
For example, where should one record?
Preferential.
Where should the mic be set up for recording?
Again, preferential.
Will the tone of an amp be significantly different in a church than in a small room with three walls?
Yes, it has to due with the acoustics and how the sound gets reflected and absorbed by the room.
Why does the tone seem to change slightly when facing the amp directly, to moving to a different part of the room while still facing it?
The sound waves move around and frequencies are absorbed/reflected by the room more at farther distances, making the room have more effect on your tone.
How different is the sound of a 100watt at volume 2, to one at volume 7? (like, how is the tone better in the later? ex: creamier, less "icepicky")
A 100watt amp at 2 won't have much if any power tube distortion. One at 7 will have varying amounts, depending on the amp design and tubes. At higher volumes, the Mids get less of an emphasis and the Highs and Lows start coming out more due to the reaction of the human ear. Also, more even order harmonics start to come out of the tubes.
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Last edited by mmolteratx at Jul 1, 2009,
#4
Quote by wiredisme
What does "even order" harmonics mean, and what's the opposite?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tube_sound#Harmonic_content_and_distortion

Basically, even order harmonics are harmonic overtones that sound in octaves and reinforce the sound and make it sound fuller. For a great tone full of even order harmonics listen to Talk To Your Daughter by Robben Ford or experience it for yourself by cranking up a good tube amp. It makes for less "ear fatugue".

The opposite is odd order harmonics, which aren't octaves of the fundamental note and add a dissonance to the tone but in many push-pull design amplifiers they cancel each other out, leaving just the fundamental, which still sounds less "full" than a good tube amp being pushed to its limits. To experience a tone full of odd order harmonics, listen to a really bad SS amp like an MG. Since the design is not push-pull, it does not cancel out the odd order harmonics and therefore the tone sounds less pleasing, resulting in more "ear fatigue".
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#5
Quote by page.slash
I searched, and found nothing about this topic. Thought I probably just fail at search.

I thought there should be a thread on what affects the sound coming from an amplifier other than gear. Like, how different will an amplifier sound in different rooms with diferent acoustics.

For example, where should one record? Well if you want to have all the reverb and such in your control then do it in a drum booth so the room is basically dead. A lot of people like different rooms because it gives it abit of a realistic character, if you want a lot of reverb go to a big room that u think has nice acoustics.
Where should the mic be set up for recording? Depends what sound you want, a lot of people use more than one, 2 is often used at a minimum, if you get a mic right up to the grill then you'll get a sound with a lot of mids and high end, if you tilt the mic on its side abit you get less of the highs and you hear the bass more. If you put the mic far back you get a thinner sound and with more bass. (Btw, if you use a dynamic mic then having the mic too close to the grill gives a horrible booming proximity effect which is to be avoided so watch out)
Will the tone of an amp be significantly different in a church than in a small room with three walls? Well a church will have a lot of reverb and a small room will have very little noticable reverb. If you put an amp right up against a corner though and put a mic there then you get a really good bassy sound (great for recording bass)
Why does the tone seem to change slightly when facing the amp directly, to moving to a different part of the room while still facing it? Because the sound is reverbing differently around the room off the objects.
How different is the sound of a 100watt at volume 2, to one at volume 7? (like, how is the tone better in the later? ex: creamier, less "icepicky") It isn't always better, if you're using a 100watt tube amp at 7 you'll get power tube distortion usually which a lot of people like, (think SRV cleans but kinda dirty sound) edit: i always play with my tsl60 on about 7 or 8 especially for cleans because it just sounds that much fuller.
Also stuff like feedback.

Dunno, thought these are good questions to be answered, as well as a place to make good suggestions for amp placements in homes and on stage and the like.



General info i can give you is that if you're playing really loud then you want a dynamic mic on your amp so you dont break the other mics. Condensors and ribbons are often used as room ambience mics (this is a good idea too if you're using two mics as you can mix between the two signals and get a fuller sound).

I would say that using two mics is a great idea, i had to mix a bands cover of 'superstition' by stevie wonder and they'd used 5 mics on the guitar amp for that. I gotta say it was worth it, the guitar sounded really nice and i had a lot of choice about panning and eqing.

Mic positions: Center of speaker directly facing it at close range = more 'general' sound of the amp, a lot of highs and mids are picked up here. To get more bass then it is a good idea to get the speaker near the floor. This will really increase the bass as those lows are reflected back.

another mic position is a very simple one for a standard dynamic mic like an sm57, put the mic on the floor flat and facing the amp about a foot back from the speaker (provided the amp is on the floor too). This vastly reduces any phase cancellation that might happen.


The bottom line is there is no 'right' or 'wrong' on this. You gotta experiment for yourself and find the 'sweet spot' on the amp or in the room etc.
Last edited by Zoot Allures at Jul 1, 2009,
#6
Where do you suggest standing in relation to the amp? because I'm finding that right beside the amp is sounding best, where infront of it a few feet away sound really shrill and sharp.
And keeping the volume at like 1 or 2 on a tube amp will make it sound really ice-picky with harsh highs? because I'm not liking the tone with harsh highs, even if it is just a practice setting.
#7
i always thought that highs don't really change or even decrease a bit with increase in volume..
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#8
I had just heard that they do, but that was only one other person on here.
Any thoughts? Opinions?