#1
So I have been playing guitar for about 5 years now and I have some skill. I am board with main stream rock and country that I play and I want to venture into the classical and flamenco side of guitar. I do not have a lot of money to spend so I can not but a new guitar. My question is could I just buy a set of nylon strings and put them on my acoustic guitar? I know you cannot put steel on a nylon guitar because of the pressure of the strings, but, would there be any drawbacks with nylon on mine?
#2
I could have sworn that Nylon strings are not long enough to fit on a regular steel string guitar.

Apart from that maybe there would be too much pressure on the Nylon strings and they would break easily?
would they produce the right sound from a steel string guitars body?

Maybe you should buy a cheap Nylon string, just to learn and practice on?
#3
i think the problem would be actually stringing the guitar
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#6
It wouldn't work well at all. It technically would not damage your acoustic, but it would be a waste of strings because regular acoustics have more bracing than classical guitars, which would make it so that the nylon strings would produce hardly any volume. I don't mean it would be soft, I mean the sound would be almost like plucking a rubber band. Don't waste money on it unless you actually have a classical guitar.

Also, just for future information...don't put steel strings on a classical-nylon guitar either. Steel strings put way too much pressure on a nylon string guitar and will literally cause the neck to snap off.
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Last edited by ReChord at Jul 2, 2009,
#7
No, don't even try it.

There is no way you will get it to work. Steel string and Classical guitars are made in different ways, and are not made to support different kinds of strings than what they were made for.

Even if you DID somehow be able to put nylons on a steel string guitar, it wouldn't be worth your trouble.
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#8
I thought that Nylon some nylon strings would string up like an acoustic. I am not looking for good tone just something to practice with until i can buy a classical guitar. My guitar is a samick.

Sorry for the account change.

Ok its a nogo then, o well. Thanks for the info. I will just use steel until i can find a cheap pawn shop guitar
Last edited by GsKoRn1 at Jul 2, 2009,
#9
Nope...sorry but it doesn't really work like that at all. You can play classical or flamenco pieces of steel string guitars though. Practice on your normal acoustic until you get a classical, the mechanics of the basic techniques are the same, at least when you are starting out, so it won't do harm at all.
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Last edited by ReChord at Jul 2, 2009,
#10
Quote by GsKoRn1
I thought that Nylon some nylon strings would string up like an acoustic. I am not looking for good tone just something to practice with until i can buy a classical guitar. My guitar is a samick.

Sorry for the account change.

Ok its a nogo then, o well. Thanks for the info. I will just use steel until i can find a cheap pawn shop guitar


If you're dying for a softer sound then try to find some Martin Silk & Steel strings. They're metal core, wound with silk, and then some sort of silver coloured metal after that. They're low tension(although not as low tension at nylon strings) and produce a very soft sound that may work well as a substitute.
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#12
Last time I tried putting nylon on a steelstring they just popped out, they won't stay stuck. There's not enough friction and not enough tension to make up for it.
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#13
Also, if you may definately want to get a classical guitar at least so that way you have those wider strings instead of them being so close to each other. You'll notice the difference once you switch =] I too started off on steel strings and couldn't advance much but right when I switched, there was huge improvement.

I have a very cheap classical guitar called Lucida LG-530 which was under $80 (don't know the exact price, I'm actually borrowing it from a friend who never plays it =P) but this guitar has some dead frets that come with it. If you can deal with that, that is a pretty decent guitar =] (while trying to buy/find my own guitar, I saw the same one at a local shop for $49.99).

Just find a cheap classical guitar and that should do. Be sure to try it out first though to make sure you're ok with it.
#15
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Last edited by ReChord at Jul 3, 2009,
#16
Quote by GsKoRn
I know you cannot put steel on a nylon guitar because of the pressure of the strings, but, would there be any drawbacks with nylon on mine?


By the same logic, wouldn't it be detrimental to equip a steel-string acoustic guitar with nylon strings? Since nylon strings produce less pressure, it would of course result in a different level, and as it's widely recommended to not remove more than one string at a time when re-stringing (due to the hazardous effects of changing pressure on the guitar too drastically at once), well...that should be an easy one to deduce. Having too little string pressure on a guitar can be terrible as well.

Low quality classical guitars are insanely cheap, so it'd be a lot smarter to just buy one of those than ruin an existing acoustic guitar.
#17
Quote by zephyrclaw
By the same logic, wouldn't it be detrimental to equip a steel-string acoustic guitar with nylon strings? Since nylon strings produce less pressure, it would of course result in a different level, and as it's widely recommended to not remove more than one string at a time when re-stringing (due to the hazardous effects of changing pressure on the guitar too drastically at once), well...that should be an easy one to deduce. Having too little string pressure on a guitar can be terrible as well.

Low quality classical guitars are insanely cheap, so it'd be a lot smarter to just buy one of those than ruin an existing acoustic guitar.


Complete and utter myth. How else are you supposed to change out a saddle or clean the whole fretboard? There is absolutely no "hazardous effects" from taking off all the strings.
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#18
And to set the record straight (again) you can buy a set of ball end nylon strings. I don't recall who makes them. There is another problem with putting nylon strings on a steel string acoustic that no one has mentioned yet. The nut slots will be too narrow to allow the GBE strings to fit correctly, resulting in high action, poor tuning stability and overall poor playability. The lower string tension(not pressure) won't harm the guitar, but will require that the truss rod be adjusted to compensate. All in all it's not worth all the hassle to do it. Stick with steels or buy a classical guitar.
#19
Hey, GsKoRn, please log back into the GsKoRn1 account and view your FOTB thread once more. I left one last message for you, and I want to make sure you see it.