#1
When I play my bass, I end up getting a lot of clacking noises coming from my strings. I think it's something to do with my technique. Is there any way I can change it to reduce the amount of clicking and clacking that comes from my playing.
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#2
Well, theres a few things it could be.

You could be way to aggressive with your finger style.

You could be plucking your notes at the fretboard, which would obviously cause clanking, and is something that a lot of beginners do

It could also be your action.

Im guessing one of those things. Youll have to tell us more before we can give you solutions
#4
You should try getting heavier strings and getting a set-up


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#5
Turn down the trebel.
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#6
you're probably hitting the strings too hard, or you have your action too low, or a combination of both. Try playing a little closer to the bridge and raising the action slightly and see if it makes a difference.
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#7
Press down on the strings as close as you can get to the actual fret without being on top of them
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#8
Quote by c3powil
Turn down the trebel.


Treble =/= clank.

The clank exists with or without treble. More treble just makes it easier to hear
#9
You could just be an agressive player. I play between my pickups and still get a bit of clack because I beat the **** out of the strings. Where are you plucking?
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#10
I think it has something to do with the action, because I'm not playing anywhere near the fretboard.
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#11
Try plucking the strings more vertically, so that they bend and move parallel to the body. If you can do this well enough, that will help more than anything. Raising the action a little bit will also help.
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#12
The easy fix would be to turn down your tone knob, but barring that the rest of these guys have it right.
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#13
Play closer to the bridge, the string's oscillation is smaller there, so it hits the frets much less.
#14
Quote by t3hrav3n
Try plucking the strings more vertically, so that they bend and move parallel to the body. If you can do this well enough, that will help more than anything. Raising the action a little bit will also help.

This is true, but it's also worth remembering that the aggressive plucking technique that makes fret buzz can be used to your advantage. Indeed, for some bassists (John Entwistle is the first person to pop into my head), the fret buzz becomes an important aspect of their tone.

Of course, I realise TC has to know how to play the right way before he can make a conscious decision to play the "wrong" way.
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#15
Quote by wouldyakindly
This is true, but it's also worth remembering that the aggressive plucking technique that makes fret buzz can be used to your advantage. Indeed, for some bassists (John Entwistle is the first person to pop into my head), the fret buzz becomes an important aspect of their tone.

Of course, I realise TC has to know how to play the right way before he can make a conscious decision to play the "wrong" way.

+1 I play aggressively and love it. A little clack sounds nice to me.
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#16
As people have said, if you're that worried about the 'clack' then try and clean your right hand technique up. Stroke across the strings vertically instead of hitting them towards the pickups.
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#17
When I had bad clack, it was because my strings were bouncing off of my pickups and the frets simultaneously. Raise the action, and if it's still a problem, take a look at your right hand technique. Precise plucks play pretty p..sounds.
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#18
Could be a combination of things. String gauge too light, action too low, aggresive playing.

So try thicker gauge of strings, maybe lower the pick ups a little if the strings are hitting them when you play.

If it's because they are hitting the frets it's because your action is too low. raise the action slightly until you notice it stop. If you get a big gap in your action then try a new technique.
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#19
Quote by tubatom868686
Treble =/= clank.

The clank exists with or without treble. More treble just makes it easier to hear


So.... If the treble makes it easier to hear, Then turning down the treble would make it harder to hear, fixing the problem...

Also... Use more of the neck pickup.
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#20
raise action? different gauge strings? check truss rod? I wouldn't sacrifice aggressive playing for no fret buzz, i play and i play bass hard.
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#21
Quote by biga29
So.... If the treble makes it easier to hear, Then turning down the treble would make it harder to hear, fixing the problem...

Also... Use more of the neck pickup.


But thats like throwing a rug over dog poo. Its not actually fixing the problem
#22
Fiddle around with your tone knob, turn down the treble, check your action (bridge saddles, truss rod, nut), fiddle around with your output cable (my MIM P-bass will crackle a little, but if I jiggle the output cable a little bit, it'll stop).

Try them and see what works.
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#23
Quote by tubatom868686
But thats like throwing a rug over dog poo. Its not actually fixing the problem



But that's not really a problem, it's a part of bass playing. It's just the string hitting the fret board, And if you have your bass EQ'd right it can actually add a little kick to your bass playing.
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#24
I play with low action, hi treble, and no clicking.

If you ask me, its either the bass or the technique. EQing can make clank worse, but it doesnt cause it
#25
As said before, try hitting the strings more vertically, and try letting the string slide off your finger better. I find I'd hit my nail on the stroke, and give me a clank sound. Try to play the strings softer. You should be able to do this while still playing aggressively, if that makes sense.
#26
Raise your action and add some neck relief and it should solve a lot of your clacking problems, as will playing near the bridge.
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