#1
Hi guys, i don't know if i am posting in the wrong forum, if i am, let me know. Anyway, currently, i have a roland cube 30x.. and was wondering what a smart choice of a multi effect processor would be? I was going to get a LINE 6 POD 2, but i would like some recommendation first. Also, i would like it so that i could change the settings to match any tone out there, from sex machineguns to metallica, megadeth, etc..any replies is greatly appreciated, thanks!
#3
You'd have to restrict your multi FX to the clean channel of your amp and even then the tone would be compromised. If you want to go the multi FX route then look at a FRFR type of amp like a powered PA speaker as they will give you the best results. As for the multi FX units, I find Line 6 gear far too digital. I've tried a few like the Pod XT Live and the Spider Valve amp but didn't like any of them. The Digitech RP range is cheaper and better to my mind and another good choice would be a Vox Tonelab, which certainly has the best tone.

Other than that, save and get a better valve amp and a couple of well chosen pedals.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#4
So what would sound good with a modeling amp or should i just use the line 6 pod for the computer?
What would be best for creating a tone i hear from other bands?
#5
To be honest, a modeling amp is designed to do that on its own so you shouldn't need additional modeling. If that amp doesn't do what you need, you either need a better modeling amp, a good multi FX system with a FRFR amp or abandon modeling in favour of a decent amp and pedals.

The reason multi FX systems don't work with modeling amps is simple. Whatever amp model you use on your Cube, it is imitating the preamp stage of a famous guitar amplifier and as soon as you engage amp modeling on a multi FX system you are feeding an imitated preamp stage into an imitated preamp stage and mixing the two will sound awful. You wouldn't plug into a Marshall JCM800 and then connect that in turn into a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier and using a multi FX system into a modeling amp is basically doing the same thing.

Modeling amps can be really good but I think that while it gives you some variety to your tone, you also have to accept its limitations. I've used modeling before and in many ways I liked it but eventually my ear developed to a degree where I couldn't live with the limitations. Even using a good multi FX system through a FRFR amp, it still ultimately sounds digital in nature. The best results I had was playing my multi FX through a Mackie SRM400 and it really did sound good but plugging into a decent valve amp soon exposed its limitations. Playing them side by side, all of a sudden the 'superb' sounds coming out of the Mackie sounded digital, 2 dimensional and horrible. From that point I realised that I had to go with a valve amp and decent pedals. It's a far more expensive option but I wouldn't go back to modeling now and I certainly wouldn't use it for playing gigs as a valve amp cuts through the mix so much better.

So, what would I do in your situation? I'm afraid that if you want to seriously improve your tone, I wouldn't keep your existing amp. If you have any aspirations towards gigging then invest in a decent valve amp and a selection of pedals to enhance your core tone. There are some good really low wattage valve amps for the home but I'm less fussy there so if you are only ever going to play at home I'd be more tempted with a modeling amp. If I was to go modeling, the best quality results will come from a good multi FX system and a FRFR amp. The Vox Tonelab has excellent tone but if you can't stretch to that, a Digitech RP500 is also very good. My last option would be to go with a better modeling amp. My first choice would be a Peavey Vypyr Tube 60 as then you have the flexibility of amp modeling with the warmth of a valve amp. It's not as good as a real valve amp but it's certainly better than what you have now. If you'd rather have a better small modeling amp, I'd look at a Vox VT50 or VT30 and if you prefer higher gain sounds, a Peavey Vypyr 30w.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#6
Quote by Doadman
To be honest, a modeling amp is designed to do that on its own so you shouldn't need additional modeling. If that amp doesn't do what you need, you either need a better modeling amp, a good multi FX system with a FRFR amp or abandon modeling in favour of a decent amp and pedals.

The reason multi FX systems don't work with modeling amps is simple. Whatever amp model you use on your Cube, it is imitating the preamp stage of a famous guitar amplifier and as soon as you engage amp modeling on a multi FX system you are feeding an imitated preamp stage into an imitated preamp stage and mixing the two will sound awful. You wouldn't plug into a Marshall JCM800 and then connect that in turn into a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier and using a multi FX system into a modeling amp is basically doing the same thing.

Modeling amps can be really good but I think that while it gives you some variety to your tone, you also have to accept its limitations. I've used modeling before and in many ways I liked it but eventually my ear developed to a degree where I couldn't live with the limitations. Even using a good multi FX system through a FRFR amp, it still ultimately sounds digital in nature. The best results I had was playing my multi FX through a Mackie SRM400 and it really did sound good but plugging into a decent valve amp soon exposed its limitations. Playing them side by side, all of a sudden the 'superb' sounds coming out of the Mackie sounded digital, 2 dimensional and horrible. From that point I realised that I had to go with a valve amp and decent pedals. It's a far more expensive option but I wouldn't go back to modeling now and I certainly wouldn't use it for playing gigs as a valve amp cuts through the mix so much better.

So, what would I do in your situation? I'm afraid that if you want to seriously improve your tone, I wouldn't keep your existing amp. If you have any aspirations towards gigging then invest in a decent valve amp and a selection of pedals to enhance your core tone. There are some good really low wattage valve amps for the home but I'm less fussy there so if you are only ever going to play at home I'd be more tempted with a modeling amp. If I was to go modeling, the best quality results will come from a good multi FX system and a FRFR amp. The Vox Tonelab has excellent tone but if you can't stretch to that, a Digitech RP500 is also very good. My last option would be to go with a better modeling amp. My first choice would be a Peavey Vypyr Tube 60 as then you have the flexibility of amp modeling with the warmth of a valve amp. It's not as good as a real valve amp but it's certainly better than what you have now. If you'd rather have a better small modeling amp, I'd look at a Vox VT50 or VT30 and if you prefer higher gain sounds, a Peavey Vypyr 30w.


+1
#7
Quote by Doadman
To be honest, a modeling amp is designed to do that on its own so you shouldn't need additional modeling. If that amp doesn't do what you need, you either need a better modeling amp, a good multi FX system with a FRFR amp or abandon modeling in favour of a decent amp and pedals.

The reason multi FX systems don't work with modeling amps is simple. Whatever amp model you use on your Cube, it is imitating the preamp stage of a famous guitar amplifier and as soon as you engage amp modeling on a multi FX system you are feeding an imitated preamp stage into an imitated preamp stage and mixing the two will sound awful. You wouldn't plug into a Marshall JCM800 and then connect that in turn into a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier and using a multi FX system into a modeling amp is basically doing the same thing.


Conceptually, once you understand the plugging a imitated preamp into a imitated preamp bit, it becomes clear why a modeller and a multifx don't go well together.

However its hell to write up that explanation. So Doadman deserves a golf clap for his effort.

Someone needs to have a explanation thread on this so it can be easily referenced. I'm really tired to typing this out time after time to explain it.

for Doadman.
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#9
Quote by Doadman
To be honest, a modeling amp is designed to do that on its own so you shouldn't need additional modeling. If that amp doesn't do what you need, you either need a better modeling amp, a good multi FX system with a FRFR amp or abandon modeling in favour of a decent amp and pedals.

The reason multi FX systems don't work with modeling amps is simple. Whatever amp model you use on your Cube, it is imitating the preamp stage of a famous guitar amplifier and as soon as you engage amp modeling on a multi FX system you are feeding an imitated preamp stage into an imitated preamp stage and mixing the two will sound awful. You wouldn't plug into a Marshall JCM800 and then connect that in turn into a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier and using a multi FX system into a modeling amp is basically doing the same thing.

Modeling amps can be really good but I think that while it gives you some variety to your tone, you also have to accept its limitations. I've used modeling before and in many ways I liked it but eventually my ear developed to a degree where I couldn't live with the limitations. Even using a good multi FX system through a FRFR amp, it still ultimately sounds digital in nature. The best results I had was playing my multi FX through a Mackie SRM400 and it really did sound good but plugging into a decent valve amp soon exposed its limitations. Playing them side by side, all of a sudden the 'superb' sounds coming out of the Mackie sounded digital, 2 dimensional and horrible. From that point I realised that I had to go with a valve amp and decent pedals. It's a far more expensive option but I wouldn't go back to modeling now and I certainly wouldn't use it for playing gigs as a valve amp cuts through the mix so much better.

So, what would I do in your situation? I'm afraid that if you want to seriously improve your tone, I wouldn't keep your existing amp. If you have any aspirations towards gigging then invest in a decent valve amp and a selection of pedals to enhance your core tone. There are some good really low wattage valve amps for the home but I'm less fussy there so if you are only ever going to play at home I'd be more tempted with a modeling amp. If I was to go modeling, the best quality results will come from a good multi FX system and a FRFR amp. The Vox Tonelab has excellent tone but if you can't stretch to that, a Digitech RP500 is also very good. My last option would be to go with a better modeling amp. My first choice would be a Peavey Vypyr Tube 60 as then you have the flexibility of amp modeling with the warmth of a valve amp. It's not as good as a real valve amp but it's certainly better than what you have now. If you'd rather have a better small modeling amp, I'd look at a Vox VT50 or VT30 and if you prefer higher gain sounds, a Peavey Vypyr 30w.


Thank You, i have learned much from this. Yeah, i think im gunna sell the modeling amp and invest in a valve amp with some nice pedals. Again, thanks a billion!