#1
Hopefully this isn't already a thing,

BUT

If you change the root of the chord, while still in the same key, such as

E - x x 0 2 3 1 - e / D Minor

Changed to

E - xx 3 2 3 1 - e / D Minor Root = F

What chord is it?
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#2
Dm/F

It is an altered bass note. You should read the faq on chord construction too.


EDIT: I'm quite confused on how to write the name of such chords. Does the bass note go before or after the chord?
Last edited by Well....... at Jul 2, 2009,
#3
Still a Dm. Dm has an F in it, so it's simply inverted, which just means that the root isn't in the bass. We write it as F/Dm.

Edit: ****, Dm/F?
#4
i would say it is still Dminor it's just in its first inversion......
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#5
okay, thanks fellas.
Soon, death metal's drums will be so fast only computers will be able to listen to it.

94? Not bad. It shall improve >=)

Who's looking for hosting? My/My Friends site will be up and running soon, looking for customers - PM me if interested.
#6
Quote by metalimaster
i would say it is still Dminor it's just in its first inversion......



I guess it would be the 1st inversion wouldn't it. Missed that...
#7
It's called a slash chord. A chord with a bass note other than the root is denoted as a slash chord. Very useful for writing chord progressions that need to have a specific bassline (i.e. chromatically descending/ascending,etc.)