#1
Whenever I try to tune my guitar it just comes straight out of tune eg: ill tune the low E String, tune all the rest and then go back to check the low string and its out of tune again (this happens with all the strings)

My guitar is a ESP MH-53 with a locking nut and my tuner is a boss TU-80 (dont think that really makes a difference)

I'm not sure what the problem is, if it's the nut, bridge, strings or something else.

I've only had 1 set of strings on it because ive only had it for a few months.

My Epi Les Paul stays in tune much better even though it doesn't have a locking nut
#2
Use the search bar? Hell, there's an almost identical topic on the front page!

Detune the whole thing and lubricate the nut of the guitar with graphite (Pencil). What's happening is your string doesn't slide through the nut smoothly, so some of it gets caught between the tuner and the nut, and when you leave it alone for a bit, what's caught slides on to the neck, detuning it.

That's probably what's happening, same thing happened to me before I started doing this. Its probably not your strings if you've had them for a while, as they're all stretched out. I do recommend changing strings every 2 months however.
#5
Turn the machine head until the string is loose.

Anywho, normally there are a screw in the middle of each nut, try tightening each on of these. It may also be the way it's strung. With the last 2 thin strings, I like to loop the twice.
#7
check the springs in your trem arm are properly adjusted, not sure whether this applies to locking trems but when you tune one string of a non-locking trem it's tension changes, which chages the trem position which detunes the other strings slightly.
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#8
Do you have a floating trem? If you do, its pretty normal for strings to go out of tune when you are tuning other strings - it takes a few iterations to tune because as you tighten the strings the extra tension pulls the bridge forward slightly, making the strings you started on flat again. You just have to keep tuning til its all in balance.

Alternatively something might be slipping like the other guys said, or it might just be your strings are really old - were they on the guitar when you got it?
#9
Quote by Guitar2theface
Use the search bar? Hell, there's an almost identical topic on the front page!

Detune the whole thing and lubricate the nut of the guitar with graphite (Pencil). What's happening is your string doesn't slide through the nut smoothly, so some of it gets caught between the tuner and the nut, and when you leave it alone for a bit, what's caught slides on to the neck, detuning it.

That's probably what's happening, same thing happened to me before I started doing this. Its probably not your strings if you've had them for a while, as they're all stretched out. I do recommend changing strings every 2 months however.



You did not read his post at all did you... He has a locking nut. With a locking nut the idea is to NOT have the string slide easily. Graphite would just make the problem WORSE.

On a lower end guitar with a cheap knock off Floyd Rose tuning stability is a very common issue. Go through the Floyd set up thread and make sure you did all of that correctly. If you did, then the problem is probably a combined issue of the locking nut and Floyd bridge being very cheap versions of the hardware.