#1
Everyone's favorite subject returns.

On topic, I was told by a friend that learning this technique on an acoustic guitar would be best. His reasoning was that the instrument is unforgiving and would force me to get the technique perfectly to get a good sound. I tried this and then went back to my electric and I thought I sounded much better.

My question is whether this was just a placebo or if I really did better on my electric because the acoustic guitar made me focus more on technique and cleanliness.
#2
I can't see why it wouldn't help. Why do you think they say it's good to learn on an acoustic in the first place? You said it yourself.
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#3
If something is sposed to be played on an electric and u practice it on an acoustic, it usually makes u better. For example... if u can play eruption on an alvarez.... you can do just about aNYTHING on an electic xD
#4
it has its advantage, such as doing it cleanly and with proper dynamics

it has its disadvantages, such as learning to control distortion
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#5
Thanks for the input. I've been practicing on the acoustic more, but I have yet to move back to my electric. My brother's Seagull has a surprisingly fast neck and pretty low action for an acoustic, but it's still a bigger challenge then trying on my Ibanez.
#6
I would say learn and practice it on all your instruments, that way you should learn to get good tone from your hands, keep it clean and learn to control the extra noise.
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#7
Quote by guitarsftw
it has its advantage, such as doing it cleanly and with proper dynamics

it has its disadvantages, such as learning to control distortion



Definitely. When practicing sweeping on a clean electric, you might THINK you're playing it well, killing every note after playing and not making any excess noise, but then you turn on the distortion and realize you suck...

Practicing on an acoustic will definitely help you with the sweeping technique. It'll help you get the basic motions and principles, but if you want to sweep with distortion on an electric, the only way to truly master it is to play with lots of gain. That way every little noise your guitar makes that you should be muting is brought to your attention in a horrible-sounding way. Practice sweeping on an electric both clean and with distortion.
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#8
Acoustic guitar is a great place for practicing technique. It makes you sound cleaner and play some things more faster. The bad thing is that you can't practice more specific stuff like hammers on or tapping. But, it is never a bad idea grab your acoustic and slow down a bit. It will give you the fresh approach to your mind.
#9
Quote by DrawnChris
The bad thing is that you can't practice more specific stuff like hammers on or tapping.


If you can't do that kind of thing on acoustic then it's the fault of your technique not the instrument. I'm not going to pretend it's exactly the same as playing on an electric but it's really not that different.
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