#1
Right, basically ive been starting to break out of box shapes, and i was watching some vids and he took an a minor pentatonic and moved it up. He still refered to this as an Am pentatonic but moved it up like 4 semitones? can someone explain to me how this is still an Am pentatonic and can someone show me to do this
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#2
I do somethin like this when I improv. The minor pent shap fits into the minor box shape, as well as the dorian box shape. So if you are playing the key of C, the box shape will work with the root on both the A note and the D note.

edit: You are not playing in the pentatonic scale anymore though, just using the same shape. And it is moved up 5 semitones from the original position.
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Last edited by sacamano79 at Jul 3, 2009,
#3
Scales are constructed of notes and intervals. Forget box shapes for a second, learn the notes and intervals and map the scale out all over your guitar neck. Then fit the box shapes back in if you want to.
#4
http://www.synapticsystems.com/studios/images/scales/aminpentallnotes.gif

All the same notes are being used that make up the scale, just in different positions and different octaves.

Here are the different shapes separated

http://guitarsphere.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/minor-pentatonic-scale.jpg
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Last edited by USCENDONE BENE at Jul 3, 2009,
#5
Stop thinking about the shapes so much, concentrate more on the sounds contained within them and the chords you're playing over. Above all, think about what sound you want next...not what your fingers are doing or what things look like.

As far as different scales goes forget moving individual patterns around, that's not going to get you anywhere, you need to look at the scale pattern over the whole neck ands back that up with the underlying theory knowledge to see how everything fits together. If you just study snippets of scale shapes all you'll do is keep learning the same thing over and over again - if the guy in the video simply moved the Am pentatonic shape up 4 semitones then it stopped being Am pentatonic, it was effectively Dbm pentatonic...although that would also depend on the chords underneath.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 3, 2009,
#6
Quote by t0m_r0cks
Right, basically ive been starting to break out of box shapes, and i was watching some vids and he took an a minor pentatonic and moved it up. He still refered to this as an Am pentatonic but moved it up like 4 semitones? can someone explain to me how this is still an Am pentatonic and can someone show me to do this


Think of it this way. Am Pentatonic is not a shape, but a series of the following notes. A C D E G

Those 5 notes appear across the entire fretboard. Infact on a 22 fret guitar, you'll find each of those notes 12 times.

But, the best place for you to start is by learning the 5 pentatonic shapes. Once you know all 5, learn how they interconnect.

Check this page out

http://www.blguitar.com/lesson/advanced/5blues_shapes.html

The first shape connects to the second which connects to the third and so on.

So if you're in Am pentatonic, Shape 1 will be based off the 5th fret, shape 2 will be the 8th fret shape 3 the 10th fret shape 4 the 12th fret and shape 5 will be the 15th fret or the 3rd fret.

Once you learn those 5 shapes, and how they connect then you need to learn where the root is in each of them. So, find every A note in all 5 shapes. After that learn the 5th which is D. Once those two are covered, learn the intervals for all the rest.

Eventually what will happen is those 5 shapes will kind of disappear, and instead you'll simply see the notes where ever they may land.
Last edited by icronic at Jul 3, 2009,
#7
Yeah, you just need to keep experimenting with the scale and working with it...however to give you a heads up here's a handy little slidey Am pentatonic run that'll take you from the 5th fret all the way up to the 22nd over 3 octaves.


E|---------------------------------------------17-20s22-
B|------------------------------------15-17s20----------
G|----------------------------12-14s17------------------
D|-------------------10-12s14---------------------------
A|-----------7-10s12------------------------------------
E|---5-8s10---------------------------------------------


See how it moves through all those patterns, but at the same time listen to it, it's just a sequential scale run going from one note to the next one in the scale. However don't just focus on the pattern, instead focus on the movement from note to note within the pattern and the sound it gives you...that will make it easier to use it in different keys
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 3, 2009,
#8
wow, that makes so much sense now, so basically all i need to do is learn how each shape connects
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