#1
A guitarist (whose a friend of mine) was talking to me today when we got on the subject of music theory. He mentioned something about cadences and how they relate to modulation. I know that a V-I is known as a perfect cadence and that V to anything else is a deceptive cadence. Are there any other cadences (well obviously there are, but do they have specific names?). If so, what are they and what is there function? If you can help with that, and maybe give me some insight into modulation and how cadences relate to it, I would be very appreciative.
#2
Well in common practice music(classical music from 1600-1700) their are 6 differnt cadences
Perfect Authentic Cadence (V-I, with root in soprano(highest note)

Authentic Cadence (V-I, without root of chord in soprano)

Perfect Plagal Cadence(IV-I, with root in soprano)

Plagal Cadence(IV-I, without root in soprano)

Half Cadence(I-V, root placement doesn't matter)

Deceptive Cadence(normally V-VI, but can be V-anything diatonic to the key)

If you have any questions, message me, and I will help you out!!
#3
Oh, I almost forgot, Cadences don't modulate key!! Cadences are mark the end of phrases, when you are writing a song, you normally would go from weakest cadence to strongest(They are in that order, with Deceptive being the weakest, and Perfect Authentic, being the strongest) You usually will want to end a song with a Perfect Authentic, because it sounds big. But these are stupid rules that you don't really matter to modern music!
#4
From what I learned from my music theory class, half cadences can be from any chord to dominant chords.

Also my music theory teacher says that a song doesn't really modulate unless it cadences in the key that it modulates to. So cadences have something to do with modulating
#5
Are you thinking of cadential patterns? Those are commonly used when establishing a new tonal center.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#6
Quote by blueriver
Are you thinking of cadential patterns? Those are commonly used when establishing a new tonal center.


Possibly, would you mind elaborating on how those patterns establish a new tonal center?
#7
I like using a deceptive cadence and then an authentic cadence to modulate sometimes. It's just my way of composing but I like building tension with that deceptive cadence and then resolving it into the new key. Your way of composing might be different, just my 2 cents.
#8
Half Cadences are anything-> V

And to be a Perfect Authentic Cadence, both chords need to be in root position with the final note in the soprano being the tonic.

And as far as I know, there isn't any such thing as a Perfect Plagal Cadence. I mean, you could call something that, but it isn't a typically used term, especially since most plagal cadences are IV 64 -> I
#9
Quote by Anteaterking
And as far as I know, there isn't any such thing as a Perfect Plagal Cadence.

Checked my theory textbook, nothing about that. That's not to say they don't exist though.
#11
Also, an Imperfect Authentic Cadence, IAC, can be V-I without the root in the bass, but could also cover inversions of either or both of those chords.
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
#13
Ah thanks, I forgot about that one.
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
#14
Quote by Anteaterking
I was just going off of my theory textbook. Which one do you have, by the way?

Theory for Today's Musician by Ralph Turak
#15
The only modulation I can think of is when a minor key ends on a major I chord raising the picardy 3rd...