#1
Okay, I've been playing about 8 months roughly. I started off happy with my guitar and about 2 hours a day practice... After getting good (Better) I became even more excited with the guitar and practiced 3-4 hours a day, now at this point I was about 5 months in. Well, recently I don't even want to look at my guitar. Just the thought of picking it up makes me sad for some reason. I can't improve, nothing makes sence (Music theory wise) and I'm tired of trying to learn so called "Easy songs" and can't play them for crap.

Does anyone know what could help me get more excited about playing? It seems Whenever I see tabs for a song or whatever it's to tough or I can't get the sound right.
I just really don't know what to do...........
#2
Take a few lessons just to get you started off again. Maybe get into some new genres and learn those songs. It does sound like you kinda burned yourself out practicing for that long each day, just got you sick of the guitar.
Quote by smb
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#3
Quote by jimivancobain
Take a few lessons just to get you started off again. Maybe get into some new genres and learn those songs. It does sound like you kinda burned yourself out practicing for that long each day, just got you sick of the guitar.


I was thinking that but I really don't know what to learn if I buy them... Just thinking about what to ask is bothering me.
#4
Get into Jazz. I was stuck after playing only rock stuff for about 3 or 4 years and when I got into Jazz I started to get better as a guitarrist and as a musician. Jazz will also open your path to new musical genres and to the practical and complex aspect of music theory.
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#5
Quote by unicornfist
I was thinking that but I really don't know what to learn if I buy them... Just thinking about what to ask is bothering me.


Maybe you could just learn some new techniques? Work on alt. picking, maybe some simple sweeping, that is if you haven't already gotten into those, but you can always use some work on those two and synchronising your hands.
Quote by smb
Freakish mammals bring the end times. It's not even 2012 yet and we're all on the path to extinction. Send cash now to God-TV!
#6
I'd get some video courses or a new genre to explore. When it becomes boring the best thing you can do is try something new. Some say the definition of insanity is to try the same thing over and over again and expect a different result. Well...if guitar bores you with what you're playing, get some lessons and learn some new tricks. There's a great program link in my signature if you're interested in a great program for learning guitar. Hope some of that helps .
#7
A couple of things. First, it is completely normal to hit a wall around 1 year or so. You may be hitting it early since you've been playing quite a few hours per day. When you first start out, it is almost impossible to not improve. Even playing for a couple of hours will do it. Of course, this is because you are going from not being able to play at all to being able to play a little - so the improvement comes fast.

Now, the best part of a year in, you are trying to go from being able to play to being able to play better. That's harder, and the progress comes a lot more slowly. Naturally, that's a little discouraging since you are accustomed to such rapid improvement.

The other thing that happens is that you become more aware of the details of your playing. So it kind of goes from: week 1 - you learn a few chords, and a riff or two, and it's like "woohoo, I can play the guitar!", to week 40 - "wow. I've really got a long way to go". It's a downer, but the thing to remember is that you feel this way because you are a better guitar player than you were back then.

The only advice I can give is to try to enjoy the journey, and not the end goal. I can tell you with total certainty, that if you really have the guitar bug, you will never be satisfied with your playing - you will always see areas where you would like improve. I have been playing over 17 years, and if you asked me, I'd tell you that it will take a solid 5 years of balls to the wall practice to get even close to where I want to be. And I also know for sure that I'll look back in 5 years from now, and think about how naive I was to think that I could be where I want to be in that amount of time. I'll probably tell you it's another 5 years from there! You're goals just keep adjusting as your skill increases. But that doesn't mean that you can't enjoy the instrument a huge amount, and take a lot of joy from the smaller improvements you see when you are an experienced player. I honestly can't imagine (or really remember that well) life without the guitar, and it's given me a ton of joy, relaxation, and blissful zoned outness over the years. But I'd be lying if I said it hasn't given me a ton of frustration too, and that there haven't been times when I felt like I would never improve, and even times when I wondered if I just wasn't cut out for it. But that's all part of that crazy love affair.

The only thing I have to add is that you might be hitting it a bit too hard and be fatigued (mentally and physically). 3-4 hours is a lot, especially during your first year. I'd try hitting it for shorter periods. Maybe just an hour a day at first, and then maybe ramp up a bit after a while. Sometimes a limit to how much you can play can make the time you do get more enjoyable. I have a lot of things to balance (wife, kids, job) so I have to put some limits on how much I play. I give myself 100 minutes during weeknights. I've found I enjoy it a lot more than when I was playing 2.5-3 hrs every weeknight, ignoring my family, and feeling like sh*t at work because I wasn't sleeping enough. I do binge a bit on weekends though
#9
All guitar players hit this problem you just need to find a way through it that suits you. When it happened to me I started to learn Sweet Home Alabama. Not my normal music but it taught me how to play various techniques accurately at speed. Also I learn to play with out looking at my strumming hand for struming / picking.

Now I have a list of things I want to learn and am just working my way through them.

Good luck
#10
After 18 months of ham fisted fumbling I managed to wring a a tune out of my long suffering telecaster that my wife recognised on her third guess , am I ready to form a band yet ? Hmm perhaps not , though Jimmy Page might not have anything to worry about for a while I dearly love the challenge and if it starts getting a task I soon find a new tab to strangle and Lightning Hopkins is still willing to play along with me on You Tube , I am getting better and have several sources I use for lessons , I love this stuff !!! best bit of advice I had was never give up , dont .
#11
Quote by unicornfist
I was thinking that but I really don't know what to learn if I buy them... Just thinking about what to ask is bothering me.
If you do get lessons just tell them what you told us. Then let them judge where you're at, and teach you.

Do you know anyone you could jam with? Doesn't matter if they're better or worse than you - just playing with other people is fun, and you learn loads.
#12
Just keep at it. Screw all this play less crap. You can never gain anything in life by doing less...unless you are trying to get fat.

I agree with learning a new style or technique, it will help. Whne I get stuck I tend to put even more time into practicing. If I play 4 hours a day and feel stuck i will bump it up to 5 hours a day.

It takes a lot of time and dedication to get somewhere with the guitar. Just keep at it and you will see gains. It just might take you longer than you think it should
#13
Quote by zhilla
If you do get lessons just tell them what you told us. Then let them judge where you're at, and teach you.

Do you know anyone you could jam with? Doesn't matter if they're better or worse than you - just playing with other people is fun, and you learn loads.


Totally, don't worry about knowing what to ask, just explain where you are at and they should help you out! Keep it up!
#14
This is natural. I went through the same thing about the same amount of time into it. What I did, and it may work for you, is to try something completely different than what you have been practicing or playing. I was playing a lot of power chord driven songs when this happened to me and I kept thinking that I will never get any better than playing simple power chords.

Well, I started to try to play some string skipping intros to songs I liked with no distortion, etc. This helped boost my confidence when I could actually play them and then opened up a whole new area for me.

Basic lesson is that it is good to sometimes step out of your comfort zone and try new things to get that feeling again.
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#15
It is OK to take a break. Short, but a break at last. In that break just think where you want to go with your guitar. Yeah, your goals, your life time achievements and dig down on yourself and try to find what's the deal with the guitar making you feel so sad.

You have a mind block, and a teacher that can understand you and guide you not only in the technique field, but also in the human part of learning: frustration, getting stuck, mind blocks and things that we already know because all of us been there. Just don't be too hard on yourself, otherwise you'll end up hating the guitar.

Be cool