#1
I just started learning theory a little while ago, I undertstand the WWHWW or whatever it is thing, and how it works on the fretboard.
What do I do now?
Is it a good idea to learn all the notes on the fretboard, then the major scale in every key?
How long would this take with 10-15 mins on it each day?
Can anyone reccommend me a good site with the positions of all the notes on the fretboard (So I don't learnt it wrong) and the notes in all the keys of the major scale so I can check if I figured it out right.
#3
I jst figured out how to work that, but it comes up strange on my computer. There is another half of a neck below the main one, an it refuses to show notes on the high e string.
#4
It's a very good idea to learn all the notes on the fretboard before you start any more theory. Here is a picture of the notes. Check out Freepower's video lessons specifically "Bitesize music theory."
#5
Music theory can be very complex or very simple...just depends on the person. You should get a good book (or surf the web to find a good site: http://www.8notes.com/theory/ is quite good when you're just starting out) on the subject. Pocket Music Theory is in a lot of bookstores and it's usually only $5 or so and it covers all the basics pretty well. Nothing replaces a good teacher though as only they can sit down with you and work with you through any questions you might have.
#6
Best way to learn theory is to listen to lots of music, analyse lots of music and use theory to help you understand what you're playing...it hasn't really got anything to do with what's on the fretboard, it's about understanding why things sound the way they do.
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#7
Quote by steven seagull
Best way to learn theory is to listen to lots of music, analyse lots of music and use theory to help you understand what you're playing...it hasn't really got anything to do with what's on the fretboard, it's about understanding why things sound the way they do.

It does if you want to write a song using theory. But I agree you should listen to a lot of music and try to use theory to understand the sounds, emotion, scene, etc.
#9
Quote by sweepbot5000
the best way to learn is to use what you learn! use it or lose it.


I already do that with the pentatonic scale. I memorized all the notes, now I make up solos and say the notes aloud as I play.

So this is good-
-Learn all the notes on the fretboard
Learn the major scale in every key, not the box shapes but the notes in them
-Once I have memorised the notes in each scale, apply it to the freboard and make songs with it, but still thinking music theory wise, not in box shapes


And I have on last question before I go of to practice. If I want to improvise over chords, do I have to figure out which key the song is in (By figuring out the chords being played) then improvise in that key?
Say the song is in the key of A, can I play any note in the major scale in that key, even if it's not the same chord that is being played ath the time?
#11
Quote by GoldfishMoon

Is it a good idea to learn all the notes on the fretboard, then the major scale in every key?



I dunno what exactly you mean, but you dont need to learn the major scale in every key because it is always the same no matter what key its in. All you need to knowis one key, such as C, and it would be the same exact thing if you were to play it in A.

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#12
Quote by forty6and2
I dunno what exactly you mean, but you dont need to learn the major scale in every key because it is always the same no matter what key its in. All you need to knowis one key, such as C, and it would be the same exact thing if you were to play it in A.


That is wrong.
The modes of the C major scale all have the same notes
but not every major scale in different keys.

C is
C D E F G A B C
and A is
A B C# D E F# G# A

So the notes in the other major scales are different.
#13
Is a mode just a scale started on a note that is not the root?

And thanks for everything so far.
#14
Yes and no. When you start a scale on another note, you could be playing a mode but you could also be playing the major scale and starting it on a different note hasn't really affected anything.

I don't want to sound patronizing but you want to have a good understanding of keys, the major scale and it's harmony before going into modes. they're not difficult to understand at a basic level, but if you don't have solid foundations you aren't going to get them and you'll just get confused.
#15
Quote by Confusius
Yes and no. When you start a scale on another note, you could be playing a mode but you could also be playing the major scale and starting it on a different note hasn't really affected anything.

I don't want to sound patronizing but you want to have a good understanding of keys, the major scale and it's harmony before going into modes. they're not difficult to understand at a basic level, but if you don't have solid foundations you aren't going to get them and you'll just get confused.


So for now, should I stick to starting and ending on the root note so I dont confuse myself?
#16
Also, do you have to stick with playing the notes within that octave? If I wanted to play the major scale in G, then next note would be A (right?) could I play the G on the 3rd fret low E, then go to the A on thr 5th fret of the high e. Would that still be playing tthe major scale because I have gone to a different octave?
#17
It is more important to know intervals on the fretboard than the actual notes you are producing.

Not saying that knowing your notes is not important, just saying, if you know intervals it is 500 times more useful. Looking at the fretboard and being able to play the m7 off your current note, (and eventually knowing what it will sound like before you play it) is in my opinion, an important goal.

10-15 minutes spent on theory is fine, as long as it is a concentrated study. I learned theory before guitar, so it is weird for me to not aproach the fretboard theoretically haha.

Rules are meant to be broken, but stuff like intervals, and hearing/seeing them is just something that is very very very useful as a muscian, not just a guitarist.
#18
You don't need to worry about starting or ending on any particular note. You can be playing over a C progression and end on a C#, and that's fine. It's going to sound very dissonant, but you can do that. Protip: Forget the word modes. For a long, long, long time. Learn the names of the notes and the intervals between them. Learn how to construct a major scale and a minor scale (with intervals). Learn how to harmonize with the major scale.

Any by 'learn', I don't mean read about it for a week and assume you've learned it. Read about it, yes. Then put it into practice on all the songs you already know and on songs you don't know. Develop your ear, and these things and you'll be waaay ahead of most people on this site. After studying this and it's all completely second nature to you, then maybe you can start thinking about modes. Thing is, they have very little practical application in most music today.
#19
Quote by MrJulius
It is more important to know intervals on the fretboard than the actual notes you are producing.

Not saying that knowing your notes is not important, just saying, if you know intervals it is 500 times more useful. Looking at the fretboard and being able to play the m7 off your current note, (and eventually knowing what it will sound like before you play it) is in my opinion, an important goal.

10-15 minutes spent on theory is fine, as long as it is a concentrated study. I learned theory before guitar, so it is weird for me to not aproach the fretboard theoretically haha.

Rules are meant to be broken, but stuff like intervals, and hearing/seeing them is just something that is very very very useful as a muscian, not just a guitarist.


This. A scale really is an ordered sequence of intervals, not a loose collection of notes. In this sense, if you want to play a major scale, it doesn't matter on what note you begin but that you jump the correct intervals.
#20
Learning the notes of the fretboard is obviously going to be useful but you might find it hard to motivate yourself purely to do that. Better would be to learn scales (major and minor and other) gradually, and little by little practice each scale until you are comfortable using it. I agree with whoever said use it or lose it!
#21
Quote by KingStill
This. A scale really is an ordered sequence of intervals, not a loose collection of notes. In this sense, if you want to play a major scale, it doesn't matter on what note you begin but that you jump the correct intervals.


Okay that cleared it up a bit. When you are playing though, should you think about the major scale in the notes your going to play (Remember the notes then just play them) or in intervals (Thinking about half and whole steps as you play)?
#22
Quote by Rain83
That is wrong.
The modes of the C major scale all have the same notes
but not every major scale in different keys.

C is
C D E F G A B C
and A is
A B C# D E F# G# A

So the notes in the other major scales are different.



I know. The notes are different but the pattern is exactly the same...

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