#1
My friend(who is black, for the sake of providing some idea as to what type of gospel music I am referring to, without being an overgeneralizing doucheface) has invited my brother and I to play with his church choir tomorrow, as they don't have a regular bassist or guitarist in their congregation. Its a mostly black Baptist church, so the music is very upbeat, lively, fun, soulful music, but I've never really played anything like it before. I have charts for all of the songs that have the piano parts and and vocal lines, and chord names above the music.

What I'm looking for is some help from a somewhat technical aspect, as to how I should go about playing this kind of music on the guitar. We have me, a pianist, a bassist, and a drummer, and an all girl choir. Are there specific inversions of the chords I should play to fit the style, or a particular method of picking/strumming? Any help at all would be appreciated.
#2
If it´s what I picture in my mind, then let your right wrist just go totally limp and hit those chords with total precision timing. Big wrist motions, not tiny alternate single note picking motions.
#3
alright. that makes sense, particularly for the less funky stuff. My goal basically is to fill the mid/high range of the instrumental mix out a bit, but gospel is totally not my normal alley. *cough*metal*cough
#4
in case vlasco cares, since he's the only person besides me that posted here, the gig actually turned out well. We played 8 or 9 songs, 3 of which we had rehearsed, one time, the night before, and none of them totally wrecked. There were a few times where I got lost and the keyboard player had to shout chord names to me, lol, but it was fun nonetheless, and the audience enjoyed it. thanks for the advice, it was quite helpful.
#5
Did you get that wrist flingin' around? It really helps you get that groove and it helps the crowd get into too.

Sounds like you didn´t have anything to worry about too much. If you had fun you should try jamming to some Gospel and Funk, it really helps your right hand rhythm and accuracy.
#6
I know it sounds a cheesy idea, but watch the Blues Brothers...seriously! Just listen to the work that Matt Murphy and Steve Cropper do on those tracks. Studying some of Jimmy Nolen's stuff isn't going to hurt either.

It's not exactly ska, but upstrokes are your friend here
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 7, 2009,
#7
Quote by Vlasco
Did you get that wrist flingin' around? It really helps you get that groove and it helps the crowd get into too.

Sounds like you didn´t have anything to worry about too much. If you had fun you should try jamming to some Gospel and Funk, it really helps your right hand rhythm and accuracy.

I did, and it worked quite well. I've always liked funk anyway, because I'm a sax player, but I'd never really done anything with gospel before. Pretty fun genre, really.
#8
Feel the rhythm in your wrist and in build-up moments of any song, feel free to accent what you are playing with techniques just as bends. If you feel really comfortable, begin to improvise over the scale you are playing without stealing too much attention and keep attention to the pastor. If he's talking while you guys are playing and/or singing, keep the song going but lower the force of your picking or manually lower the volume so the pastor's words get priority on what is being heard by the audience.

Hope it helps.
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