#1
I'm a beginer and learned how to play the major chords
I practice about 3 hours a day and it's going quite well

It seems like I can't shift in between chords fast enough so I wouldn't be able to hear the pause

I'm trying to play the GCDG chords in sequence with double strum
I think my problem is in placing fingers on the strings one by one starting with the first finger

I'm not sure if this is the right way to do it
I tried to place the fingers on the strings all at the same time but I just can't place them on the correct strings this way no matter how hard I try


Anyone could suggest the best way to do this

any help appreciated
#2
If you're just learning a new chord, slowly put your fingers in the right position and strum it for a bit while your fingers are in that shape - make sure the sound is clear. After a bit of this, try with another chord (slowly put on fingers on, strum a bit) so your fingers get used to the shape. Then try to go from one to the other - it doesn't have to be quickly. With a more practical way, you could try this whenever you pick up your guitar as for warming up. This is just the way I did it though, there may be a better way.

Edit: Eventually you'll get used to it and be able to quickly switch between chords. (Forgot to add that bit...)
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Last edited by Slash546 at Jul 4, 2009,
#3
Hi, I'm just now learning to play guitar and I still do kind of have the problem with 1 finger going at a time, but's it's become less and less noticeable as I practice. My D chord is getting really good, use to my pointer would slide into (from a E chord) then my 2nd finger would hit, then my 3rd. It was like that for like 3 days, but on 3rd day I started to land my 3rd finger first instead of my 2nd finger, and on the 5th day of practicing now they kind of land at the same time (still a slight delay, but it's almost fast enough to play songs now). I don't really practice having them all land at same time, it will just come naturally I think. (my E and A chords land pretty good).

I'm learning a song called "Hurt " (the johnny cash version) to practice some chord changes. It just goes Am, C, D. If you don't know Am it's exactly the same as E except move it down a string, and don't strum the top string.
Last edited by Kalagaraz at Jul 4, 2009,
#4
Quote by metamp
I'm trying to play the GCDG chords in sequence with double strum
I think my problem is in placing fingers on the strings one by one starting with the first finger

I'm not sure if this is the right way to do it
I tried to place the fingers on the strings all at the same time but I just can't place them on the correct strings this way no matter how hard I try
Don't worry about spped for now - concentrate on placing all your fingers together, instead of one at a time. If that means you have a 5 second pause in between chords, so be it. Keep doing the same change backwards and forwards like that (with different strumming patterns to alleviate the boredom) until it starts to feel natural to place all your fingers at once - after a while muscle memory will kick in and your fingers will 'know' where to go, and you'll start to speed up. Speed is just a by-product of accuracy and economy of movement, so get your technique down and get your changes clean and speed will come naturally.
#5
My advice would be slow practice. You have to remember as a guitarist, every time you pick up your instrument you are practicing. So if you do something bad, like pause for a moment and take an extra second in the middle of a chord progression, you are practicing and teaching your fingers to do that instead of playing them through smoothly. So slow down and make sure your wrist is straight and fingers are flexible, because making this mistake only means you are drilling it into your head over and over.
#6
Have your mind imagine where your fingers will end up when you have changed chords.
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#7
Try changing chords without looking at the fretboard. It will take a long time, but muscle memory will help you remember where to place your fingers. If your fingers know where to go without your eyes having to help, just think about how much easier/faster chord transitions will be!
#8
Its mostly down to practice but try to move between chords with the minimum amount of movement. Try not to lift you fingers too high off the frets when changing between chords as this will slow you down.Watch how other people who can play well do it and see if you find their way easier. Once you find a way that seems right then do it slowly and accurately and then practice alot to build up the speed but keep the accuracey.

I went through this when I first started playing guitar and found using the minimum amount of movement and accuracey were the way to go.
#9
Ah the infamous CDG changes. I know a great tip to help with these (and F too)
Chances are, when you play a G you use fingers 1&2 on the 5th and 6th strings and finger 3 on the 1st string. That's the root of the problem. Try playing it with fingers 2&3 on the 5th and 6th and finger 4 on the 1st. Its a bit odd at first but your hand is in a good shape to switch to a C chord and back by just moving the basic shape and adding in your 1st finger. With a bit of easy practice the change will flow much better between G,C and F shapes.
There is a similar alternative on the D shape by using your 4th finger on the 2nd string instead of your 3rd finger. That has uses that are a bit different and allow a flow in the little licks on BADGE (Cream), Magicians Birthday (Uriah Heep) and other songs.
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#10
i'd say that if you just practice the chord sequence, nice and slowly, just build up the speed gradually, they'll become engrained in your muscle memory- it'll take a while but that's honestly how to build the speed on your chord changes, once you can think of a chord and your fingers just pop into that shape, that's when you'll be sorted- and it does take time! Just make sure when you practice you are playing it at a speed where you can do it right!
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#11
I think it will work, I do it slowly, I can even hit the strings when I don't look at the fretboard
I put in 4 hours yesterday and 3 hours this morning and I think I can see improvement but I still place fingers on the strings one by one, it is like the first finger is the reference position for the other 2
#12
If your having problems going from G>C then use ur pinky on the bottom string, then use your second and third fingers on the top 2 strings, then to get to the C you just add your index finger and move the middle and ring finger down a fret each.
#14
I've been practicing from two weeks now and I'm pretty confident saying that it really helps if you keep trying to play the chords without looking and even better without thinking about where to put your fingers.

For a couple days now I've been trying to play Hurt by johnny cash and I'm getting a bit better now and I can pretty much play it if I can just keep my mind distracted from what I'm actuality doing. It sounds weird but I can play it flawlessly if I'm focusing on listening to the music I'm playing rather than playing it, but as soon as something pops into my head (Ok switching to a D chord) my fingers get confused and I end up putting a finger on the wrong string.
#16
Quote by jsepguitar


It is almost impossible to form my fingers into a chord position in the air like that guy in the video suggests and land them on the strings at the same time
so I'm kinda stuck
#17
Quote by metamp
It is almost impossible to form my fingers into a chord position in the air like that guy in the video suggests and land them on the strings at the same time
so I'm kinda stuck


me too, i normally put my fingers down as close as i can to the chord then move the finger/s that are wrong/off on the right string, like the D chord i put my first and second on the right ones but my 3rd finger drops onto the 3rd fret of the first string first, its fustrating!
#18
Those guys you that you see forming the chord shape in the air have a TON of practice behind them. Be paciant and practice the changes as much as you can...countless hours if you must....until you get tired; but make sure that the tehnique is perfect. Dont get frustrated from a day to another that you didnt seem to improve as wished. I usually notice improvements in my guitar playing when i'm not thinking about how much i ve improved.... How weird is that? The main problem with US , novices, is that we see on youtube or wherever guys that play awesome and kind of want to play like they do in a matter of months. Well....let me burst the bubble people. That wont happen for any of us except maybe for prodigies like Sungha Yung.
From my shallow experience with guitar i could resume to the following words:

1) Lots of practice;
2) Use the most eficient tehnique;
3) Lots of pacience;
4) Try not the make the learning process a burden; have fun instead!
Last edited by OvidiuDanut at Jul 7, 2009,
#20
I've been following the JustinGuitar lessons and justin says it's ok to "walk the chords" (placing one finger at a time) when learning, just to keep practicing switching chords as fast as possible. That that peter guy says to NEVER do this or you will never be able to play fast, to make the changes in the air.

I find it impossible to switch in the air, so I don't really see how you could practice like that if you can't even do it.
#21
Well I'm trying to form my fingers into a chord position without holding the guitar and it's not working
For example the G chord.....I can't have my 2 an 3 extended and my 4 to be bent to land the 6th string
I just have no control over the 4 until the 2 and 3 landed