#1
Well lets say I have a progression and one chord in it is a C major (not very common, I know). If I was going to have some notes I held out during a solo over that wouldn't it sound best to use the notes made up IN the chord itself? Obviously holding a D over a C major won't sound very nice. So would holing a C, E, or G sound good/best? And does that mean all other tones in the scale should be used when note being held out, for shorter rhythms? For example: playing the D I mentioned earlier, but not holding it out.
#2
that my friend is where modes come in handy.

you can play ANYTHING over any chord you want, anything at all. you could play a C major scale over a C chord, tried and true. you could make it diminished by playing a C phyrygian or bluesy with a C Mixolydian. you could shred over it with a C locrian (although, io dont recommend it). there are all types of possibilities when soloing with modes in mind.
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#4
simpler terms: different notes do different things over different chords. a D over a C chord would create tension, while playing the 3rd or 5th (E and G respectively) would sound more... familiar.
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etc.




Quote by freedoms_stain
I can't imagine anything worse than shagging to Mark Knopfler.

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#5
Quote by TK1
that my friend is where modes come in handy.

you can play ANYTHING over any chord you want, anything at all. you could play a C major scale over a C chord, tried and true. you could make it diminished by playing a C phyrygian or bluesy with a C Mixolydian. you could shred over it with a C locrian (although, io dont recommend it). there are all types of possibilities when soloing with modes in mind.


That's not how modes work. You don't play 'phrygian' over a C major chord. You can play C major with some accidentals and call it phrygian, but that's not what it is. Same with the other modes, I was just using phrygian as an example.

TS: Watch the Marty Friedman Melodic Control vid. This is exactly the **** he talks about in there. It's really a great watch and it will help your soloing. It's in bangoodcharlotte's signature, I don't have a direct link right now. But seriously I recommend it.
#8
A C major chord isn't common?

But anyway, yes frequent use of chord tones is always a safe bet when improvising, and also a safe bet for a note to resolve your phrases to. It will sound 'right'. You basically worked it out for yourself. But it really depends what kind of sound you're going for. If you want to create a lot of tension in your solo, emphasising that D note over a C chord is a viable option. There are no hard and fast rules, I mean I was just watching a Miles Davis video where he was resolving every phrase to the b2.