#1
As used by ESP..SET-THRU, it's essentially a combination of all three methods, there is a bolt on pocket, a long neck plank, (not necessarily longer scale length) and glue.
It's generally more stable and offers more sustain and tone, there is also next to NO hell joint or backplate on bolt on necks, great method of construction in my opinion.
#3
I agree, they are quite awesome. My ltd has one, and it makes it so much easier to play on the higher notes. I didn't think it bolted on as well though?
#4
A neck is a neck is a neck...AFAIAC. No discernable difference between the various types so long as the work is done properly. My Suhr Classic has better sustain than my Gibson LP...go figure. Never had a problem with warping, tuning stability, etc. on any guitar I've owned.
#5
Quote by jblittlefield
A neck is a neck is a neck...AFAIAC. No discernable difference between the various types so long as the work is done properly. My Suhr Classic has better sustain than my Gibson LP...go figure. Never had a problem with warping, tuning stability, etc. on any guitar I've owned.


True to some extent... but neck thru joints have undoubtedly the best room for maneuvre for smaller neck heels
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#6
Quote by chimpinatux
True to some extent... but neck thru joints have undoubtedly the best room for maneuvre for smaller neck heels



A well done bolt on joint can have perfect access.
#7
The "Set Thru" ESP uses isn't actually a set thru, which is like a 3/4 neck thru, think a ridiculously long neck tenon. It's a contoured heel set neck, which I like a lot.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400 with Gotoh GE1996T (EMG 85/60)
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
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You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#8
Ed Roman Guitars have used this technique for awhile...
I don't think any neck joint is better than any other, but I do prefer setneck and neckthru over bolt-on for the smaller/nonexistent heels. I know a well built bolt-on can have a great neck joint too, but it's so much easier just to get a good setneck.

If you want another variation, check out a Deep Set Neck Tenon. Think 3/4 neckthru with a Quilt/Flamed top
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#9
Yeah I think all this stuff about neck construction is just nonsense. The only reliable scientific study that I've seen on the subject concluded that bolt-on construction offered the best resonance, with set-in construction being in the middle, and thru-construction offering the least resonance. I realise this is the reverse of the common wisdom of the subject, but I say again, this is from a scientific paper, which in my book makes it more reliable than all the nonsense marketing crap these companies churn out.

The most important thing about the article, was that although the difference was the reverse of what's commonly held to be true, the difference measures in nanoseconds, and is inaudible to the human ear. They didn't go on to state the following, but in my opinion it's just the next logical step - a guitar's 'sustain' must then relate more to the woods used, the overall mass of the body, and stuff like the bridge construction, etc. But yeah, ignore everything Gibson say on the subject. I say this as a Gibson owner, and I've played a fair few of other peoples Gibbos.

I've seen many arguments on sustain. One I always find hilarious is the old "brass nut" thing. Now, surely anyone with a brain would know that this could only really help for open notes. For any note that's being fretted, the nut doesn't even come into the equation. Surely a brass bridge would be infinitely better? Maybe it'd suck ass though, since brass is pretty soft.
Last edited by Martin Scott at Jul 5, 2009,
#10
Certain Kahlers have Brass saddles actually, and not all Brass is soft. Red Brass is pretty hardy stuff
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]