#1
I've been practicing very slowly (40bpm start) and increasing the speed by 5bmp to help my technique and speed. I've been using the C chromatic scale and all the modes in the C position with the metronome. Is there anything I should add or change in this routine to make it more effective? (I downloaded the 5 page compilation in sticky if you suggest something out of that)
#2
chromatic scales aren't really practical...try doing the same practise routine with major and minor scales
#3
Quote by hippieboy444
I've been practicing very slowly (40bpm start) and increasing the speed by 5bmp to help my technique and speed. I've been using the C chromatic scale and all the modes in the C position with the metronome. Is there anything I should add or change in this routine to make it more effective? (I downloaded the 5 page compilation in sticky if you suggest something out of that)

It's pretty pointless to be brutally honest - you don't measure your ability by how fast you can play a few exercises.

You should use the metronome to keep time in all things you play and practice, but focus on how accurately you can play not the numbers on the metronome. Likewise as far as scales and things go focus on understanding them, learning how they sound and work musically, also learning the chords they work with.

As far as exercises go you should look to create something practical from your scales, not simply play the scale straight. Make sure you're using the whole scale over the whole fretboard too, there's little to be gained from focussing on one small snippet of the big picture.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 5, 2009,
#4
Quote by steven seagull
It's pretty pointless to be brutally honest - you don't measure your ability by how fast you can play a few exercises.

You should use the metronome to keep time in all things you play and practice, but focus on how accurately you can play not the numbers on the metronome. Likewise as far as scales and things go focus on understanding them, learning how they sound and work musically, also learning the chords they work with.

As far as exercises go you should look to create something practical from your scales, not simply play the scale straight. Make sure you're using the whole scale over the whole fretboard too, there's little to be gained from focussing on one small snippet of the big picture.


I know all the theory of the scales and chords and what now. I'm looking to improve my preciseness and clarity over the whole guitar. I guess I didn't quite phrase my intentions correctly :/
Either way, I see your point.
#5
It's not always mentioned in threads about practicing slowly, but a key to slow (accurate) practice is to be as efficient as possible. If your technique isn't efficient at slow speeds, when you speed up it won't be as effective. When you practice something slowly, spend time looking at both hands. Is your fret hand moving efficiently, with very little extra movement, fingers close to the fretboard? Is your pick hand picking effficiently, or is it all over the place? Also, make sure you keep your hands and body as relaxed as possible. You want to make the movements as effortless as possible.
#6
^ i know this. I try to do that as much as possible. But what should I play whilst doing this?
#10
Quote by tenfold
Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar.

This.

As much as I love Batio and Gilbert, this book is much better.
Plus it's a book, you don't need to be near a computer or dvd player everytime you practice with it.
#11
are there any exercises from it I can get from the internet, or ones I can get that are just as effective?
#14
To practice scales, I wrote down all the scale types I know, and all the root notes on little bits of paper, and then put them into two hats/bags. This way I can always pull out a random combination and it stops me getting too focused on one thing.

The great thing is, as you learn more, you just add more peices of paper, and you can keep testing yourself on random scales that you know.
#15
Damn thats a good idea! You write down specific techniques/scales or anything and just randomly practice it?
#16
chainsawguitar, that's a good idea. I might try that sometime.

@hippieboy444
I think the best thing to do is to get up to the fastest you can play cleanly without any mistakes consistently. Then start about 12bpm slower then that. Gradually increase your speed. This is a great warmup and it gets you used to playing around your maximum speed, IMO.
#17
^ yeah. i heard that works. But wouldn't going down to 25bmp and going up help even more? People say that makes your technique perfect, which is what I'm trying to do.