#1
Well, I'm assuming my band will be playing a show on Saturday the 11th. I told the owner of the bar we'd be playing at that I'd have an answer for him by the 1st, and I answered him on the 5th. (Only because I wanted to have a practice with the band before I told him we could do a show, so wouldn't ... y'know ... suck.) So here's all of our issues laid out. (This isn't the Pit, so I'll go into a decent amount of detail seeing as I'm no expecting any "cool blog, bro" comments.)



    Well, Our line up gear currently consists of me, the Guitarist using a nice Peavey Stack. Can't remember the exact model of it because it's over at our practice space. Our rhythm guitarist is rocking off of a 15 Watt Fender Frontman Practice Amp. I bet you can already imagine the conflict of sounds because we have to turn that little thing up 11 while my stack doesn't ever have to go past 5 unless we're looking to shake houses.

    - Is it possible to hook the Frontman up to a Cabinet? Because our drummer own a Fender Cab that a guitarist from one of his last problems left.

    I'm the vocalist. I don't own a PA system because I don't have the money to put out for one.

    - Do most venues have PA systems / How many venues have you played at that didn't, so you'd have to provide your own?



      - This would be our first show. I've written a good 8-10 songs complete with lyrics but we only know 100% 3 of them. So, we only want to play three songs, obviously. Do many venues allow bands to play for 15 minutes or so?

      - What tips can you offer for a guy going up on stage for the first time? I've been talking to the band about stage presense. Like for instance, Simultaneous headbanging. It sounds lame, but I've noticed most crowds go crazy when the band starts doing it. Of course my priority is how we sound.

      - Talking to the audience: We kinda want to extend our set for as long as possible. So would 30 seconds of banter with the audience between each song be good, and if so, errr.. what are some suggestions as to what to say?

      Also, We had an idea for how to keep the audience occupied while we're tuning. We have a song where every instrument comes in one by one. And so basically, it would start off with our drummer drum-solo'ing and basically as each of us got done tuning, we'd start playing with the drummer. It's a riff we all know really well, but it sounds really sick. Good idea?

      So, if anyone could address these questions, that'd be amazing and anything else you might want to tell me is great. Thanks!
      #2
      Here's my attempt to answer what I can:

      If it's a venue where gigs happen often, it should have a PA, but I highly reccomend you find out ASAP if it does. Not too sure with the cab question, I've got no experience with them, but you should be able to put the amp through the PA too one way or another (assuming there is one) so you won't have to crank your amps too far... Your amp would need an output for the PA though, or mic it up I think... Sorry, someone else will have to answer the amp questions properly, I'm not too sure about how all that stuff works.

      Stage presence: You're in a bar, don't go like mega crazy or anything, but you're right, don't just stand there... but it's your first time, so don't feel too pressured to mosh out, focus on music first.

      15 minutes isn't very long. Ask the guy how long he expects you to play for. I'd say at least half an hour in a personal opinion, but still see what the guy says.

      Talking to audience is good... just ask about how they're going, drinks good, how much you like it there, etc.

      The tuning idea, yeah that'd probably work, as long as the intro doesn't drag on for ages, and once you've all playing the intro riff that you know when to go to the next riff
      #3
      I don't think you should do the gig. You've got too many problems and too little time, so I think it would be better to try to find a way out.

      Good luck if you do go ahead though!
      #4
      1) A cabinet will not increase the volume at all. A 15W solid state amp is going to be too quiet unless mic'd, full stop.

      2) many music venues will have house PA, but with bars and pubs (especially on the cover circuit) you'll need your own. But why are you asking us? Ring the venue!

      3) I don't know of any venue that would allow a show as short as 15 minutes, except some play to play gigs. But they don't give a damn about your music in the slightest as long as your mates cough up the cash to get in.

      4) Too much banter will annoy the crowd - they're there to hear music, not a stand up show. Don't do the whole "this next song, I wrote last month and it's about....", no-one cares. Keep talking minimal and witty - if you can't do the witty, increase the 'minimal'.

      5) Yes, starting off with one instrument and building up is a good way to start a song, if used sparingly. To keep the flow between tunes when there's major tuning breaks, our drummer sometimes keeps really quiet, almost inaudible, sidestick beats going until we're ready to start on the next song.


      All in all, I get the impression you guys aren't quite ready to be gigging - your set is too short, and some of the questions you ask are a little too elementary. You learn best from experience, but I suggest you play a few times at friends' parties and small gatherings, before you jump in the deep end with public bars and venues.

      Most importantly, enjoy yourself and don't rush.
      #5
      Quote by BotC
      Well, I'm assuming my band will be playing a show on Saturday the 11th. I told the owner of the bar we'd be playing at that I'd have an answer for him by the 1st, and I answered him on the 5th. (Only because I wanted to have a practice with the band before I told him we could do a show, so wouldn't ... y'know ... suck.) So here's all of our issues laid out. (This isn't the Pit, so I'll go into a decent amount of detail seeing as I'm no expecting any "cool blog, bro" comments.)



        Well, Our line up gear currently consists of me, the Guitarist using a nice Peavey Stack. Can't remember the exact model of it because it's over at our practice space. Our rhythm guitarist is rocking off of a 15 Watt Fender Frontman Practice Amp. I bet you can already imagine the conflict of sounds because we have to turn that little thing up 11 while my stack doesn't ever have to go past 5 unless we're looking to shake houses.

        - Is it possible to hook the Frontman up to a Cabinet? Because our drummer own a Fender Cab that a guitarist from one of his last problems left.

        I'm the vocalist. I don't own a PA system because I don't have the money to put out for one.

        - Do most venues have PA systems / How many venues have you played at that didn't, so you'd have to provide your own?



          - This would be our first show. I've written a good 8-10 songs complete with lyrics but we only know 100% 3 of them. So, we only want to play three songs, obviously. Do many venues allow bands to play for 15 minutes or so?

          - What tips can you offer for a guy going up on stage for the first time? I've been talking to the band about stage presense. Like for instance, Simultaneous headbanging. It sounds lame, but I've noticed most crowds go crazy when the band starts doing it. Of course my priority is how we sound.

          - Talking to the audience: We kinda want to extend our set for as long as possible. So would 30 seconds of banter with the audience between each song be good, and if so, errr.. what are some suggestions as to what to say?

          Also, We had an idea for how to keep the audience occupied while we're tuning. We have a song where every instrument comes in one by one. And so basically, it would start off with our drummer drum-solo'ing and basically as each of us got done tuning, we'd start playing with the drummer. It's a riff we all know really well, but it sounds really sick. Good idea?

          So, if anyone could address these questions, that'd be amazing and anything else you might want to tell me is great. Thanks!


          Never assume you have a gig until it has been confirmed by the venue owner/promoter/agent. You need to contact the guy and make sure you are playing.
          You also need to ask him if the length of your set will be enough and if there is an 'in house' PA that you can use. If there is and if it's a decent sized PA (upwards of 500 watts) then you can probably mic the 15w amp up, but it'll sound strange on stage, one guitar will be loud on stage while the other will be loud front of house.

          Talking is fine but 30 seconds between each song may get you shouts of 'Get on with it!' It's actualy longer than it sounds to be talking without repeating yourself.

          The tuning thing may work and help to fill out your set, but it is also considered to be very unprofessional to go on stage untuned. It may be a better idea to just turn it into an instrumental with each instrument coming in in staggered stages. It'll sound cleaner that way.

          Be completely honest with yourselves and makes sure you're ready to play live, also be honest with the guy who's organising the gig and if he says that you don't have enough material, or that they don't have a PA, cancel.
          Go and work out a 45 minute set and approach him at a later date when you're ready. If you go on stage half assed, untuned and with only 15 minutes when people, and more important, the promoter who's booked you, are expecting more from you, then you will gain a bad rep that can often be hard to lose. It's much better to simply take your time and make sure you do it properly, and the promoter would probably prefer that you cancel now while he can still get hold of another band rather than empty his venue with a bad performance later.

          You may find these useful.
          http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/SlackerBabbath/blog/51119/
          http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/SlackerBabbath/blog/51018/
          http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/SlackerBabbath/blog/46334/
          #6
          Quote by SlackerBabbath


          Slacker, they're very detailed and well written - I'll be sure to drop the link to others who need it!
          #7

          The tuning thing may work and help to fill out your set, but it is also considered to be very unprofessional to go on stage untuned. It may be a better idea to just turn it into an instrumental with each instrument coming in in staggered stages. It'll sound cleaner that way.
          QUOTE]

          We have every intention of tuning beforehand. The idea was for the middle of the set since we planned to tune between songs. And other than the fact we have a short set, we're 100% ready with the songs we know and they sound great. I've just never played a live gig before and wanted to get some helpful info...
          #8
          Quote by BotC
          Quote by SlackerBabbath

          The tuning thing may work and help to fill out your set, but it is also considered to be very unprofessional to go on stage untuned. It may be a better idea to just turn it into an instrumental with each instrument coming in in staggered stages. It'll sound cleaner that way.


          We have every intention of tuning beforehand. The idea was for the middle of the set since we planned to tune between songs. And other than the fact we have a short set, we're 100% ready with the songs we know and they sound great. I've just never played a live gig before and wanted to get some helpful info...


          Considering you only have 3 songs 100% down you shouldn't have told the owner that you were down for a show, you definately need about half an hours worth of material ready for a show. I would recommend canceling this this show and try again when you have about 5 or 6 songs down 100%
          Quote by hostilekid
          shadesofanger, you're my hero.


          Quote by GoldenBlues
          So I was wondering, are black people capable feeling love? I mean can their brains comprehend that kind of emotion, or are they not programmed that way.
          #9
          Quote by shadesofanger
          Considering you only have 3 songs 100% down you shouldn't have told the owner that you were down for a show, you definately need about half an hours worth of material ready for a show. I would recommend canceling this this show and try again when you have about 5 or 6 songs down 100%


          Correction. 3/8 original songs. We know plenty of covers, we just rather play Originals.
          #10
          When a bar hosts a show, you're taking up space. Space that could be occupied by paying customers. He also needs to show up earlier to let you in for a load-in and soundcheck (or pay an employee to do so). If he's spending his time/money, you damn well better be giving him a good incentive to do. Bringing in a ton of paying customers is how you do that. a 15 minute set brings in nobody. Most cover bands around here are expected to play at least 3 sets of 45 minutes.
          Translation: you play a show when you're ready to do so, not a second before.