#1
recently ive been trying to learn music theory ive learned about chord/scale construction, a bit about modes, chords in each key and chord progressions but i havent really found anything about power chord progressions or which power chords are in each key i know it may be a bit stupid but can someone please explain this to me

thanks
#2
power chord progressions are the same as triad progressions except there's no major or minor chords to worry about - they're all just normal power chords(Except the vii, but that's rarely used)

it goes like
I5 II5 III5 IV5 V5 VI5 VIIb5(no 3rd)
#3
Power chords are no different from Barre chords or open chords as to how they fit in chord progressions or what chord is in what key. Think of these chords as the same as open chords when it comes to theory.
#4
o_q I have deduced.

The root note of the power chord dictates it's key. If the root is in the key, it will almost always fit in. (I only say almost because i'm not sure about the rules regarding certain keys)
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#5
Power chords are really just intervals of a perfect 5th, not really chords and as someone mentioned don't have a major or minor quality because there is no 3rd.

So, you can bend alot of rules.
#6
Protip: If the root of your power chord fits into the key you're playing in, the power chord will be in key. even power chords built on the 7th scale degree usually sound fine (even though the fifth is technically out of key).
#7
Quote by timeconsumer09
Protip: If the root of your power chord fits into the key you're playing in, the power chord will be in key. even power chords built on the 7th scale degree usually sound fine (even though the fifth is technically out of key).
In this situation, you can lower the fifth degree of the power chord, therefore making it a diminished 5 dyad. I guess that makes it no longer a power chord, but hey, it's still a dyad.

Also, whoever posted second (I believe) posted a major power chord progression, but you could have a minor progression too.

A major progression will generally look like this:
I5 II5 III5 IV5 V5 VI5 VII5 VIIIb5no3
...whereas, a minor progression will look a bit like this:
I5 IIb5no3 III5 IV5 V5 VI5 VII5 VIII5, and remember, the third, 6th and 7th degrees are minor, so they will be lowered a half step.
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Last edited by food1010 at Jul 6, 2009,
#8
Power chords aren't technically chords. They are just single notes with another note added to "bulk it up".