#1
Any got any
my technical skills are gd but that means nothing if My timing is crap more so for the bass.
exercises for timing is what I need.
#5
One thing I've found that helps is to record yourself while you play. It lets you look back and see all the mistakes that you don't always notice while playing. Timing and otherwise. if you don't have a recording program look up Audacity. it's free and it's what i use.
dean edge one 5 string
Schecter studio-4
Samick fairlane-6
Ibanez sb900
Ibanez btb775
Fender p bass special deluxe

Dean Del Sol
Ibanez prestige rg2610

Peavey TKO 65
Peavey vb-2
Quote by the_perdestrian
listen to revelation, for he is wise in the way of bass-fu
#6
Writing songs down on paper helps a lot with practicing and understanding how the beats and the actual lines you are playing line up. Even though everyone is going to tell you this practice with a metronome! It helps so much.

If you want to learn songs with abnormal timings try learning some Dream Theater or Meshuggah.
Also, keeping in time with the drummer is one of the most important parts to having a steady song.
#7
Metronomes are great but the best is to get ahold of some drum loops or ideally a good drummer and play with them. Playing with a drum will teach you to lock your internal beat with the drums and dig the pocket deep.

Most cheap ass keyboards have drum / rhythm options built in. (Check flea markets and charity stores). Many of the multi effect pedals also have built in drum loops as well. There are a few online drum programs (freeware) as well. The one that immediately comes to mind is Hydrogen ( http://www.hydrogen-music.org/ ).

The trick is not to up the tempo until you can play something perfect 5 x in a row. Ben is correct; you have to train both hands in the effort or you're wasting valuable practice time.

Also get some handrums and drum along to songs. This helps to even out and make your timing more consistent.
#9
I found tapping your foot a great help, sounds silly, but it worked for me.

personally I've never found metronomes useful/effective. I'll be using my ear to make sure I'm playing correctly, I have trouble using it to listen for the metronome too. I've never had the same problem with a drum machine though. Of course it's personal oppinion, even my brother waxes lyrical about them and I know alot of people find them very helpful. there are metronome websites and stuff you don't need to go and buy one if you don't want to.
#12
Quote by anarkee
The trick is not to up the tempo until you can play something perfect 5 x in a row. Ben is correct; you have to train both hands in the effort or you're wasting valuable practice time.


Not trying to be a prick, but eight times, as proved by some psychologist that Malcolm Gladwell quoted in one of his recent books.
#14
Try to jam with a drummer as much as possible, you and the drummer are the rhythm section after all, also try out drums for yourself and see how the drums relate to the bass' timing.
#15
Quote by jimRH7
I found tapping your foot a great help, sounds silly, but it worked for me.

personally I've never found metronomes useful/effective. I'll be using my ear to make sure I'm playing correctly, I have trouble using it to listen for the metronome too. I've never had the same problem with a drum machine though. Of course it's personal oppinion, even my brother waxes lyrical about them and I know alot of people find them very helpful. there are metronome websites and stuff you don't need to go and buy one if you don't want to.



Oh yea, I always tap my foot. It gets to a point where its automatic after a point. Good luck!!!
#16
Quote by Sly Taco
Oh yea, I always tap my foot. It gets to a point where its automatic after a point. Good luck!!!


try tapping your foot while playing dream theater, it's a reall bitch
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ