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#1
does anybody here knows anyway to develop it without "being born with it", does any of you or someone you know has it?
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#3
I don't think you cant develop perfect pitch unless your born with it, you can however train yourself to have relative pitch, it takes a very long time with lots of practice, usually years
#4
I think you can develop it to an extent - it's possible to memorise the sound of each note. Thinking of the first note in songs you're very familiar with can help you with this. It's not really true perfect pitch though - hearing a note and immediately being able to identify it - or whether it's slightly off.

The real question is why you would want waste time trying to achieve it. Having good relative pitch is a much, much more useful skill - essential really.
#5
i don't know anybody with perfect pitch but i know a few people who claim to have 'relative pitch'. i don't have perfect or relative pitch but i have some good input.

check out this website:

http://www.good-ear.com

go 'level by level' and don't move on until you absolutely don't get any wrong

also... know your music theory (esp. intervals, scales, and chords) and learn songs by ear.
#7
From what I've read and heard nearly anyone can develop absolute pitch recognition (as distinct from any kind of really good relative pitch). However those that develop it best are those that begin to distinguish between absolute pitch colours in childhood but it can be developed later in life. It just takes more training and can be lost more easily.
Si
#8
The violin teacher and cello teacher from my U both have perfect pitch, and they're both on the string juries come the end of the semester Even if I'm the out of tune by 1/100 of a tone, you can see the cellist's head fly up and a a look on his face that screams out "What was that!"

Also, I was once at a gig and I had to borrow another guy's keyboard (he has perfect pitch). I asked him how to change the transpose settings on it (we tune 1/2 step down) and he's all like "Oh God, evil stuff transposition!"

Makes me glad I don't have perfect pitch actually, means that tuning my bass down half a step would drive me crazy.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jul 7, 2009,
#9
I've always heard that you have to be born with perfect pitch. Truthfully, most people I know who have perfect pitch hate it, because the world is not naturally in tune, and they hear things like the air conditioner whine or car horns and realize that they're x cents flat or sharp, and it drives them nuts.

But, perfect pitch is really unnecessary as long as you have decent relative pitch. And you can develop that through ear training exercises. I'm pretty sure there's a thread somewhere on here with a bunch of them on it, and they'll help you out.
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
#10
Quote by pwrmax
The violin teacher and cello teacher from my U both have perfect pitch, and they're both on the string juries come the end of the semester Even if I'm the out of tune by 1/100 of a tone, you can see the cellist's head fly up and a a look on his face that screams out "What was that!"

Also, I was once at a gig and I had to borrow another guy's keyboard (he has perfect pitch). I asked him how to change the transpose settings on it (we tune 1/2 step down) and he's all like "Oh God, evil stuff transposition!"

Makes me glad I don't have perfect pitch actually, means that tuning my bass down half a step would drive me crazy.


Why would tuning a half step down drive someone with perfect pitch crazy? As long as you're in tune, it's not like you're playing quarter tones or anything. You're just playing a half step below.
#12
Quote by SKAtastic7770
You must be born with perfect pitch.

You're not born with the ability to recognize pitches. However it's something that is alot easier to develop at an early age (as with everything else).
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#13
Quote by Aramoni
does anybody here knows anyway to develop it without "being born with it", does any of you or someone you know has it?

no one has it. no one is even born with it. its pretty impossible for a human being to have anything perfect. and with hearing, the tones can be so microtonal that i highly doubt anyone can tell a tone down to the smallest degree.

that being said, some are born with better ears than others. but you can develop a good ear. it takes a lot of practice really. do some interval trainging and regular practice with scales. try testing yourself blindfolded. get out a key board and have someone pay notes for you and really try to listen for the right tone.

honestly, i dont think its that important. almost no musicians have "perfect pitch". they just practice. usually once you find the key of a song the rest isnt too hard unless you get into complex chords and key changes. but even that can become second nature to you if you are used to it. interval training will help you with figuring out songs by ear.
#14
I can hum an E note, which sounds stupid but I can tune my guitar anywhere because of it.

So iguess i would have pefect pitch, but only with an E note.
#15
They say that afters years of being a musician you can develop a "relative perfect pitch"... thankfully i was born with it but there are a few drawbacks to having it
#16
Quote by timeconsumer09
Why would tuning a half step down drive someone with perfect pitch crazy? As long as you're in tune, it's not like you're playing quarter tones or anything. You're just playing a half step below.

That guy that plays keyboard says that hitting a D and having a Db come out of the speakers is irritating because he knows that's not what a D sounds like. He would basically have to process in his head that every single note he plays is lower one by one, and it would just be easier for him to play in a different key.
#17
Quote by srob7001
I can hum an E note, which sounds stupid but I can tune my guitar anywhere because of it.

So iguess i would have pefect pitch, but only with an E note.

I can hum the 4 main strings of a bass guitar, but that's called relative pitch, not perfect pitch.
#18
Quote by pwrmax
The violin teacher and cello teacher from my U both have perfect pitch, and they're both on the string juries come the end of the semester Even if I'm the out of tune by 1/100 of a tone, you can see the cellist's head fly up and a a look on his face that screams out "What was that!"

Also, I was once at a gig and I had to borrow another guy's keyboard (he has perfect pitch). I asked him how to change the transpose settings on it (we tune 1/2 step down) and he's all like "Oh God, evil stuff transposition!"

Makes me glad I don't have perfect pitch actually, means that tuning my bass down half a step would drive me crazy.



This makes no sense at all
Originally Posted by StewieSwan
Record him while he's playing secretly and then tell him that some other guy wants to join and he sent a recording.

When your friend says, "Man, this guys sucks", tell him, "It's you, dumbass"
#19
Quote by Pennderinn
They say that afters years of being a musician you can develop a "relative perfect pitch"... thankfully i was born with it but there are a few drawbacks to having it

If you had perfect pitch you'd hear that the guitar in one your mp3s is very out of tune.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#20
Quote by 7even
If you had perfect pitch you'd hear that the guitar in one your mp3s is very out of tune.


yes i know haha
#21



This makes no sense at all

Why? Individuals with perfect pitch often have difficulty with transposition.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#22
Please explain. A half step down from something is still a "pitch".

Even a guitar tuned to say 443 instead of 440 is still a "pitch" and should be recognized as such by someone with perfect pitch.
Originally Posted by StewieSwan
Record him while he's playing secretly and then tell him that some other guy wants to join and he sent a recording.

When your friend says, "Man, this guys sucks", tell him, "It's you, dumbass"
#23
Quote by standupnfall
Please explain. A half step down from something is still a "pitch".

Even a guitar tuned to say 443 instead of 440 is still a "pitch" and should be recognized as such by someone with perfect pitch.


Yes...so what? Where did anyone, anywhere, ever claim that they weren't pitches?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#24
A443 still is a pitch, yes. However, people with perfect pitch (and this could lend credence to the argument that what they really have is extraordinary relative pitch) identify pitches as being in tune with A440, because that is at least the Western standard of intonation. I'm sure if they had been used, throughout their entire life, to hearing A443, A443 would sound in tune to them. But they werent, and so it sounds flat.
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
#25
You didnt explain anything there, not looking for E-gangster web fights here, just info thanks.

If you have perfect pitch shouldn't you be able to recognize something played in Eb rather than E? Or any other pitch, why would someone with perfect pitch have more of a hard time transposing than someone without it?
Originally Posted by StewieSwan
Record him while he's playing secretly and then tell him that some other guy wants to join and he sent a recording.

When your friend says, "Man, this guys sucks", tell him, "It's you, dumbass"
#26
I think the problem the guy who was mentioned in that anecdote was having was that the notes he was playing was not lining up with what he was hearing in his head. He played a D, he expected to hear a D, but instead he heard a Db. It wasn't an issue of he couldn't cope with it being a Db, it was more of his playing not matching what he was hearing.
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
#27
Quote by jslick07
A443 still is a pitch, yes. However, people with perfect pitch (and this could lend credence to the argument that what they really have is extraordinary relative pitch) identify pitches as being in tune with A440, because that is at least the Western standard of intonation. I'm sure if they had been used, throughout their entire life, to hearing A443, A443 would sound in tune to them. But they werent, and so it sounds flat.



Understood, however I would think A443 would sound Sharp to them.

But someone with truly perfect pitch should also recognize different tunings even if they are only a few cents off
Originally Posted by StewieSwan
Record him while he's playing secretly and then tell him that some other guy wants to join and he sent a recording.

When your friend says, "Man, this guys sucks", tell him, "It's you, dumbass"
#28
You're right, my mistake, had a dyslexic moment there and thought it said 434.

And you're probably right, somebody with truly perfect, fully chromatic pitch should be able to recognize that. To be honest, I'm not familiar enough with perfect pitch to know whether that even happens.
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
#29
Quote by pwrmax
I can hum the 4 main strings of a bass guitar, but that's called relative pitch, not perfect pitch.



I stand corrected. i guess I have a one note relative pitch.
#30
And It makes sense about a player not liking hitting a D and hearing Db when talking about the transposing thing but not from a listeners point of view, only a players.
I am not a big fan of alternate tunings myself but this is more of a player and musician issue than a perfect pitch issue. As a real player would be more comfortable playing the piano part in a different key than playing it standard and using a machine to transpose it down
Originally Posted by StewieSwan
Record him while he's playing secretly and then tell him that some other guy wants to join and he sent a recording.

When your friend says, "Man, this guys sucks", tell him, "It's you, dumbass"
#32
Quote by standupnfall
If you have perfect pitch shouldn't you be able to recognize something played in Eb rather than E?


Yes. I don't really recall anyone saying any differently.

Or any other pitch, why would someone with perfect pitch have more of a hard time transposing than someone without it?


Stop talking about recognition. Recognition has nothing to do with this. People with perfect pitch tend to think of pitches in absolute terms. Eb isn't just "E one half step lower", it's something else entirely. Many of them have a great deal of difficulty with transposition because it destroys an integral part of the work (the original pitch). The same song played in two keys may as well be different songs.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#33
Try reading out loud the color and not the word written, without hesitation and correctly the first time through.

Blue
Yellow
Green
Purple
Burgundy
Cyan


From what I hear, that's what it's like for perfect pitchers when they play a transposed instrument.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jul 7, 2009,
#34
Quote by standupnfall
And It makes sense about a player not liking hitting a D and hearing Db when talking about the transposing thing but not from a listeners point of view, only a players.
I am not a big fan of alternate tunings myself but this is more of a player and musician issue than a perfect pitch issue. As a real player would be more comfortable playing the piano part in a different key than playing it standard and using a machine to transpose it down

honestly, i cant understand how that would be a problem. my teacher in high school had "perfect pitch" (i dont think anyone can ever be perfect) and he loved using the transposer on the keyboard. it makes some keys easier to play in. and since i liked to tune down a half step on my guitar, when we jammed he liked to do the same on the keyboard. and this is a guy who can tune a piano by ear.

i can understand it being a little wierd at first though. sometimes i tune my guitar down to C standard and at first its strange having a C come out instead of an Eb (which i normally tune to) but that goes away in like a minute. im not really sure how tuning an instrument down or up would be hard to handle for any longer than that.
#35
You absolutely can. It just takes time

I have developed my ear from not being able to identify any pitches to the point where I can identify A and Bb. Next up is B!

EDIT: I guess I should elaborate on how Ive gotten this far.

For starters, every time I play a scale on guitar/bass/piano (pretty much has to be a fixed pitch instrument) I sing with the scale.

The second part is even easier than this though. Every morning when I wake up, I say "Im going to sing a B right now." I sing what I think it is, then go to my keyboard, play the REAL B, and compare.

It took me about 3 months of the second method before I could get the A and the Bb
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Jul 7, 2009,
#36
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
"perfect pitch" (i dont think anyone can ever be perfect).

You can be born perfectly pitched, it's a rare genetic anomaly but it's possible. If you're close to perfect but not quite then it's called relative pitch.
#37
Quote by pwrmax
You can be born perfectly pitched, it's a rare genetic anomaly but it's possible. If you're close to perfect but not quite then it's called relative pitch.

until i see proof of this, i wont believe it. i HIGHLY doubt a human can be born with a sense that is PERFECT. i would assume they'd be able to tell me how many centz off a note is if they had perfect pitch. but i doubt many could do more than just say its sharp or flat.

besides, you cannot be born knowing the pitches. you do need some development either way. you need to still learn the notes and what pitch they are before you can say they are out of tune or not. PLUS people with "perfect pitch" usually like to use a piano for demonstration.....which is never "perfectly" in tune. the tuning of the strings actually needs to be fanned out so they can better play in tune with themselves. so technically what they think is "in tune" is actually very slightly not in tune (according to what they should be mathimatically).

so what am i saying? you still need to learn it. some may be faster and some may be better, but no one is born perfect at anything.
#38
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
until i see proof of this, i wont believe it. i HIGHLY doubt a human can be born with a sense that is PERFECT. i would assume they'd be able to tell me how many centz off a note is if they had perfect pitch. but i doubt many could do more than just say its sharp or flat.

besides, you cannot be born knowing the pitches. you do need some development either way. you need to still learn the notes and what pitch they are before you can say they are out of tune or not. PLUS people with "perfect pitch" usually like to use a piano for demonstration.....which is never "perfectly" in tune. the tuning of the strings actually needs to be fanned out so they can better play in tune with themselves. so technically what they think is "in tune" is actually very slightly not in tune (according to what they should be mathimatically).

so what am i saying? you still need to learn it. some may be faster and some may be better, but no one is born perfect at anything.


The problem is that you're using a definition of "perfect pitch" that conflicts with the one in use by the rest of the world.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#39
I agree that there could well be people born with a genetic predisposition to learning perfect pitch, but there's no way a baby could pop out already knowing it. 'A' having a pitch value of 440hz (and so forth) was an arbitrary development, not something that could be built into your genes.
#40
Quote by Beserker
I agree that there could well be people born with a genetic predisposition to learning perfect pitch, but there's no way a baby could pop out already knowing it. 'A' having a pitch value of 440hz (and so forth) was an arbitrary development, not something that could be built into your genes.


That's not what perfect pitch is.
Before you reply with "what is it then?", I'll preemptively answer with "use google".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
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