#1
So I'm pretty new to playing with other people and I'm wondering about this.
Say I play with a bassist, if I solo in A (for example), does this mean he can play any note in that scale?
And also, how does chords go with scales?

Again, completely new to this.
Thanks.
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#2
Yes, there really aren't any rules. As long as he would stay in A he wouldn't be all off. However he'd also want to outline the chord progression that you're playing over.
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#3
And also, how does chords go with scales?

For a chord to be perfectly in key, it must contain only notes from the key you're in (C major'd be C D E F G A and B). However, you can ignore this to a degree for more colour/etc in your songs. I'd avoid minor 3rds, diminished 5ths, and minor 7ths in a major key unless you're using it to change key or just sound scary.

To put this into context, the 7 "standard" triads that're in C major are
C Dm Em F G Am Bdim
I ii iii IV V vi viidim (This is a standard notation for chords- damn useful to have)
The Bdim is often avoided apart from Bdim -> C since it's diminished, hence hard to use. A few useful resolutions to the I (using numeral notation since it's more general):

vib7(minor 7th chord) I
viib5(b5b7 too if you want)* I
V7 (dom7, that's a major triad and a minor 7th) I

A "normal" way to do things is to start on the I chord, then have a few measures of other chords in the key, then one of the resolutions back to the I, or if you want a more solid resolution IM7 (7th chords roll like that, I've not got the theory to tell you why) could be used.

Sorry if I overkilled it. xD

*That's a diminished triad, or a half-diminished 7th chord (1 m3 5 m7, a full diminished is 1 m3 5 bb7, bb7 is the same note (not the same function) as an M6- full-diminished chords are plain weird in practice IMO, I never use them- just a pretty piece of theory to me, not that they can't be used tastefully)

Say I play with a bassist, if I solo in A (for example), does this mean he can play any note in that scale?
Yes. However, you can use accidentals (notes not in the key) to colour things up, add a little unpredictability into the mix. Just make sure you're both aware of when this is going to happen, and use it sparingly- you've still got to maintain resolution to that A (or whatever you're resolving to) unless you're going to change key, in which case using a chord/note that's common to both keys involved is a good way to go, then start progressions around the new centre to establish it. Maybe try using an IM7 chord to start off the new key- stronger resolution and all that.
Last edited by MopMaster at Jul 7, 2009,
#4
Quote by MrMicrowave
So I'm pretty new to playing with other people and I'm wondering about this.
Say I play with a bassist, if I solo in A (for example), does this mean he can play any note in that scale?
And also, how does chords go with scales?

Again, completely new to this.
Thanks.


GO read the Music Theory FAQ Guide.
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