#1
So I'm pretty new to playing with other people and I'm wondering about this.
Say I play with a bassist, if I solo in A (for example), does this mean he can play any note in that scale?
And also, how does chords go with scales?

Again, completely new to this.
Thanks.
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#2
he plays a progression in that key.

do you know your muisic theory?

as in relative minors solos over major progressions and scale formulas and all that, if not you might get stuck in a rut or sound crap when improving over a progression. do you even know what notes make up the key of A for example. do you know what a minor 3rd is, do you know what note in the scale formula the relative minor is,

you need to nail your theory otherwise stick with playing pentatonics.
#3
It depends on the type of bassist you play with. Most bassists will set a groove and allow you to solo over it. They'll follow any chord changes in a song and you just gotta follow them. This is how I do. And it works quite well. The intricacy of the basslines vary from bassist to bassist, some will play simple root notes, others will build a funky riff and tell you to just go from there.

You'll really want to learn your music theory, major and minor scales, pentatonic scale for sure (can't tell you how many times a day I use that one), you'll want to learn what chords fit where, rather than just "They sound good". Learn the names of the notes on your fretboard if you don't know them already. You need to know how chords are built, what notes etc.

Oh and I'm sure Ibanezgod1973 didn't mean to make it seem like there is any shame in playing pentatonic scales. It's incredibly useful and used by musicians across the world on a daily basis.
Gear:1991 Fender MIJ Jazz/Squier VM Fretless Jazz -> Pitchblack -> Way Huge Green Rhino -> Boss OC-2 -> Boss DD-7 -> Markbass Tube 800 -> SWR 4x12.

Flat wounds. Flat wounds on everything. Everything is a little fatter when it's flatter.
#4
no there`s no shame in playing pentatonics, but taking the modal route adds a bit more flavour and the listener will understand you more, as you can tell by my gear i like alot of vai and satch amongst others where the guitar has to really standout to create the mood of the song and whilst i use pentatonics i try to work away from them after a couple of measures.

I use pentatonics to create the heat then make the flames dance with the use of modes
#5
Quote by ibanezgod1973
he plays a progression in that key.

do you know your muisic theory?

as in relative minors solos over major progressions and scale formulas and all that, if not you might get stuck in a rut or sound crap when improving over a progression. do you even know what notes make up the key of A for example. do you know what a minor 3rd is, do you know what note in the scale formula the relative minor is,



No.
I'm looking to learn this, but I've not yet found a decent lesson to break it down all the way for me.

But thanks for the answers.
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#6
online lessons are very limited with regard to learning theory.

Dave Weiner the rhythm guitarist for Steve Vai and he`s got two bands of his own produces a vid lesson every wednesday called riff of the week that might help you grasp some understanding http://www.youtube.com/user/riffoftheweek but he varies between technique an theory.