#1
Okay, so I was practasing Pitch test couple of weeks back.

I was curious how would it help to learn major 2 or 3 perfect 4 or 5 major 6 or 7, 8

and so forth.


Thanks.
#3
you mean why do intervals matter? they're the basic building blocks of music. anything from deciding where a melody should go to dissecting chords really.
#4
Minor Second- Jaws theme

Major Second- Just think of a major scale, the first two notes are a major 2nd

Minor Third- Brahms' Lullaby, the first two notes. Well, three, but the first pitch is repeated twice.

Major Third- Oh When the Saints Go Marching In Oh When the Saints...

Perfect 4th- Here comes the Bride

Tritone- "Maria" from West Side Story Ma ri a.

Perfect 5th- Well, harmonically its just like a powerchord, but melodically think of the first two notes of the main Star Wars melody

Minor Sixth- If you think of the song "Yeah" by Usher. The first interval is a Perfect 5th, the second is a Minor Sixth.

Major Sixth- the first two notes of the NBC chime, so N B C.

Minor Seventh- "Somewhere" from West Side Story. There's a place for us...

Major Seventh- the one I've most commonly heard I don't like too much, but I can't think of a better one right now. Its Somewhere Over the Rainbow, but like this. Some- Where O ver the Rainbow. The first two notes are an octave, but from that first note to that third note is a major 7th. If someone has a better one I'd love to know, cause I need one too.

Octave- come on man, its an octave. It'll just ring, you'll know it, they're essentially the note, just displaced.

Hope that Helps
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
Last edited by jslick07 at Jul 7, 2009,
#5
jslick07, that's a great way to memorize intervals, and for the OP, knowing the intervals would help you in recognizing them in music you hear, so that would help you in playing songs by ear, singing, basically it would help you understand why something sounds like it sounds.
#6
Quote by jslick07
Minor Second- Jaws theme

Major Second- Just think of a major scale, the first two notes are a major 2nd

Minor Third- Brahms' Lullaby, the first two notes. Well, three, but the first pitch is repeated twice.

Major Third- Oh When the Saints Go Marching In Oh When the Saints...

Perfect 4th- Here comes the Bride

Tritone- "Maria" from West Side Story Ma ri a.

Perfect 5th- Well, harmonically its just like a powerchord, but melodically think of the first two notes of the main Star Wars melody

Minor Sixth- If you think of the song "Yeah" by Usher. The first interval is a Perfect 5th, the second is a Minor Sixth.

Major Sixth- the first two notes of the NBC chime, so N B C.

Minor Seventh- "Somewhere" from West Side Story. There's a place for us...

Major Seventh- the one I've most commonly heard I don't like too much, but I can't think of a better one right now. Its Somewhere Over the Rainbow, but like this. Some- Where O ver the Rainbow. The first two notes are an octave, but from that first note to that third note is a major 7th. If someone has a better one I'd love to know, cause I need one too.

Octave- come on man, its an octave. It'll just ring, you'll know it, they're essentially the note, just displaced.

Hope that Helps

I know almost none of these songs you said, so I thought I'd drop a few ones I use:
Minor Second - Walk This Way's main riff, between 1st and 2nd notes, and 2nd and 3rd notes, these are minor seconds.
Major Second - Between the first and second notes of Texas Flood, that's a Major Second.
Major Third - Thunderstruck's Main riff, between first and second notes.
Perfect Fourth - Elle Klein Nachmusic by Beethoven. You know it for sure, youtube it up. Between the second and third notes.
Diminished Fifth - The Simpsons. The very very beginning, when voices since "theee simpsonssssss", between those two words, that's a diminished fifth. Also, YYZ intro is full of diminished fifths.
Perfect Fifth - Star Wars theme, first two notes of the main melody. Also, Crazy train, between 2nd and 3rd note.
Minor Sixth - Crazy Train, between 4th and 5th note.
Octave - Somewhere over the rainbow. Between the first and second notes. Also first two notes of sweet child o' mine.

Someone fill in the blanks for Minor Third, Major Sixth and Minor/Major Seventh, can't think of anything.
Rubys.
We could change the world if we had the source code.
#7
Quote by Rubys
I know almost none of these songs you said, so I thought I'd drop a few ones I use:
Minor Second - Walk This Way's main riff, between 1st and 2nd notes, and 2nd and 3rd notes, these are minor seconds.
Major Second - Between the first and second notes of Texas Flood, that's a Major Second.
Major Third - Thunderstruck's Main riff, between first and second notes.
Perfect Fourth - Elle Klein Nachmusic by Beethoven. You know it for sure, youtube it up. Between the second and third notes.
Diminished Fifth - The Simpsons. The very very beginning, when voices since "theee simpsonssssss", between those two words, that's a diminished fifth. Also, YYZ intro is full of diminished fifths.
Perfect Fifth - Star Wars theme, first two notes of the main melody. Also, Crazy train, between 2nd and 3rd note.
Minor Sixth - Crazy Train, between 4th and 5th note.
Octave - Somewhere over the rainbow. Between the first and second notes. Also first two notes of sweet child o' mine.

Someone fill in the blanks for Minor Third, Major Sixth and Minor/Major Seventh, can't think of anything.


Elle Klein Nachmusic is by Mozart.

But anyways, I do believe Smoke on the Water has a minor 3rd between the first 2 notes. Correct me if this is wrong.
#8
Eine Kleine Nachtmusik is indeed by Mozart .

Smoke on the Water is a also a minor third.

I'm wondering if anybody else is like me here. When I hear Perfect 4ths, I hear two varieties. There's the sol-do (like in Eine Kleine Nachtmusik), which sounds one way, and then there's the do fa leap like... in something else. But those two have a completely different sound to me. Anybody else?
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John