#1
I don't really have anyone to jam with where i live, so i try to record a rhythm track thru audacity and plugging my amp into my microphone input.

But the quality is faaaaaaar from is it naturally from the amp.

Is there a recording device i can run from guitar-multi-effect-recording machine- amp.

where i can record parts and save them like, part 1, part 2, part 3, and then order them anyway i want to, for them to play in that order.

to where i would play it as, 1.3.2 or. 3.1.2


i just need a better way to playback my own rhythm tracks so i can actually hear the different "feels" of modes on scales and etc.

so i can have a chord progression , so i can practice some lead over that.


the closest i can find are machines that will record but not play thru an amp. while im playing and it sounds too, unnatural.
Quote by soXlittleXtimeX
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Last edited by shanchett99 at Jul 7, 2009,
#2
a looper ??
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#3
Quote by WTF!!is a TAB
a looper ??

Thanks man


i'm kinda new to the whole recording and effects world


could you tell me a good one for a kinda low price around 100$
Quote by soXlittleXtimeX
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shanchett, you get an E for Effort

Quote by CodChick



ROFLLOBSTER
#4
Yeah a looper pedal would probably work for you. Or even a fairly cheap multi-track (Boss BR600 maybe?) so you can record and upload to your PC and then playback.
#5
I have a Boss RC-2 which is great. Its probably more like $150 though
#6
for $100-150 you'd have to find it used. not that hard, just saying. a digitech jamman goes for like 3 bills new. worth it? not IMO. and don't ask how i know that. why not drop for a cheap laptop, throw sonar on it and introduce yourself to the world of recording? it'll cost a little more, sure, but you can still do it on the cheap (trust me), and it'll be a more lasting investment that'll teach you much more about how sound works than a looper will.
#7
Quote by GrisKy
for $100-150 you'd have to find it used. not that hard, just saying. a digitech jamman goes for like 3 bills new. worth it? not IMO. and don't ask how i know that. why not drop for a cheap laptop, throw sonar on it and introduce yourself to the world of recording? it'll cost a little more, sure, but you can still do it on the cheap (trust me), and it'll be a more lasting investment that'll teach you much more about how sound works than a looper will.



so do i use sonar like VirtuAmp. just plug my guitar straight into my computer and uses sonar's guitar rig 3 and the million other things it has?

it doesnt tell me
Quote by soXlittleXtimeX
^
shanchett, you get an E for Effort

Quote by CodChick



ROFLLOBSTER
#9
If you get a better hardware interface you can go on using Audacity. Check musician's friend, I think there are some USB interfaces with a couple of line-ins and even a preamped XLR input or two for about $100
#10
Quote by shanchett99
so do i use sonar like VirtuAmp. just plug my guitar straight into my computer and uses sonar's guitar rig 3 and the million other things it has?

it doesnt tell me


same concept... whatever plugins you dig (most of which can EASILY be found on certain torrent sites... hey, gonna find out sooner or later). the line 6 toneports are dirt cheap (less than your run of the mill stomp box) and sound ok. you're not gonna blow anyone away with your killer tone, but it's not bad out of the box.
sonar is a DAW. it's where you lay down your tracks, then you go back and play others with the previous ones.
ok, now i know i said before that you could do this for cheap, but doing so will have some consequences...

...let's say you pick up a half-way decent laptop out of a pawn shop for a couple hundred bucks, you pirate all the software, and you buy an interface and a set of tracking-quality headphones, all told for somewhere in the $600-700 range (or there-abouts). you can expect a healthy dose of inherent latency to be a huge pain in your ass when you're layering tracks, and even though you were in time, what you just played doesn't line up to where you played it. it's an easy but time consuming fix, just edit the take after the fact, but there isn't much that you can do to make it go away without significantly raising your budget.

it's a great way to get your feet wet without dropping way more cash on better recording gear is pretty much what i'm saying. if this in no way interrests you, then by all means, hunt craigslist for a good deal on a looper.