#2
Whichever works for you. A popular mic to use is a Shure SM57. It's a dynamic mic. I've seen people use both.
#3
You need a dynamic mic. Condensers are for higher frequencies, like drum overheads.

There are no rules though, experiment if you have the cash.
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#5
I usually use a Shure SM57 when micing amps, but I prefer (if the amp allows) to send an output to a D.I. box, as it will not pick up other noise like the 57 would. I have also tried a SM81 (condenser) on an amp, but always get better results with the 57.
#7
Quote by Cholas
Are you talking about a studio application or a live gig?

Are you talking to the TS? I would assume that if it was for a studio, they would have higher quality mics than a 57.
#8
Quote by pdawson
Are you talking to the TS? I would assume that if it was for a studio, they would have higher quality mics than a 57.


Yeah, I should have mentioned I was talking to the TS.

If MetroGnome is setting up some kind of home studio thing, I'd say a condenser, but if they're looking for a live application I'd say an SM57.

My other post should have been clearer, but hey, that's what this mug of coffee is for.
#9
Quote by Cholas
Yeah, I should have mentioned I was talking to the TS.

If MetroGnome is setting up some kind of home studio thing, I'd say a condenser, but if they're looking for a live application I'd say an SM57.

My other post should have been clearer, but hey, that's what this mug of coffee is for.

Well if it's for a live gig, depending on the size of the room, he might not even need to mic it.
#10
Quote by pdawson
Well if it's for a live gig, depending on the size of the room, he might not even need to mic it.


Another good point. Haha my posts make more sense when you clarify them. I should hire you permanently.
#11
Quote by Cholas
Another good point. Haha my posts make more sense when you clarify them. I should hire you permanently.

I already work as an A/V Technician
#12
You would usually use a dynamic microphone, but you could use a consensor mic if you want to pick up more higher frequencies. 1-2 inches away from the speaker cone.
#13
Quote by DeadlyIllness
You would usually use a dynamic microphone, but you could use a consensor mic if you want to pick up more higher frequencies. 1-2 inches away from the speaker cone.

Also he needs to make sure the sound board can do Phantom Power (+48v) and if it can not, you will need a Phantom Power supply unit, which is fairly cheap. But really, to keep it simple, go with a SM57.
#14
dont put a condensor right in front of a guitar amp is a general rule of thumb unless you find out something otherwise. If you're playing really loud through a cranked tube amp that's a great way to ruin an expensive mic. A cheap good mic is the sm57 for amps. Ribbon or condensor mics are usually meant for vocals, this is a very general overview though.
#15
Audix i5 is a great one too. I think they're smoother than an SM-57 at big volume, they cost the same and they're tougher.
#16
if we're talking live (as in ANY uncontrolled environment), pay close attention to your polar patterns... you don't want your awesome tone getting mixed in with the asshole next to your cab screaming "play freebird!" (exaggeration, but i think you get my point, outside noise = bad).
#17
Quote by Zoot Allures
dont put a condensor right in front of a guitar amp is a general rule of thumb unless you find out something otherwise. If you're playing really loud through a cranked tube amp that's a great way to ruin an expensive mic. A cheap good mic is the sm57 for amps. Ribbon or condensor mics are usually meant for vocals, this is a very general overview though.


This is true in a few cases, however the Royer R121 ($1200 ribbon mic) was specifically designed to sit in front of a cranked guitar amp. It is probably THE best mic on the market for micing guitars because it picks everything up so evenly that it reproduces what you're hearing in the room almost exactly.
#18
Generaly I'd say 57. Condensers are very sensistive and play loud and you could ruin it. Plus they are very fragile and there are many risks during a live gig. You could easily ruin it. Plus it might be too sensitive in the envirmoent, picking up other sounds and so on. A 57 always works. They are EXTREMLY dureable and sound great. I say that a guitar with an SM57 mgith not always be the ABSOLUTE best tone, but it always sounds good. Most people use SM57s, so a guitar miced up with one is something we will percieve as "right", since we are so used to hearing it. Plus they have a very nice midrange, making them suitable for guitar.
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