#1
I have made a song and found that an E symmetrical scale fits with all the chords. However, the bass line is based around the A minor pentatonic scale, except for one or two notes. My problem is I am not sure how to tell whether the symmetrical scale played over the bass line as well as the chords is going to clash. How can I tell? I'm not finding it easy to use just my ear in this instance.
#2
Quote by GirlGerms
I have made a song and found that an E symmetrical scale fits with all the chords. However, the bass line is based around the A minor pentatonic scale, except for one or two notes. My problem is I am not sure how to tell whether the symmetrical scale played over the bass line as well as the chords is going to clash. How can I tell? I'm not finding it easy to use just my ear in this instance.


What're you finding so hard about using your ear? Just play and if it sounds good keep it, if it doesn't don't, that's just about all there is to it.

Don't worry about theory until you need to tell someone else what you're doing; that's what it's really there for.
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#3
Symmetrical scales sound hideous, IMO.

But yeah, if you like how it sounds, then don't worry about the theory.
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