#1
I'm trying to learn how to tremelo pick and I am running into two problems.

#1 is that I either have trouble getting up to speed, or when I get up to speed my pick gets caught on the string and I stop. How do I avoid this? is there a certain way to hold the pick for minimum resistance?

#2 When I get it going the string starts to emit a loud harmonic, even with the guitar unplugged. It's much louder than the note I'm trying to make. I think that I am actually making many very quick pinch harmonics from the pick striking the string so fast.
#2
#1 Practice


#2 Pinch harmonics are only created when part of your finger or thumb accidentally touches the string immediately after your pick hits it.


Of course. There's only one way to get better at anything. Practice. Start off slowly at a comfortable speed and gradually speed up over time. Play with a metronome if you can, it'll do wonders for your speed and consistancy.
#3
If youre trying to get up to speed, I always found it effective to use either the G, B, or high E strings. Use something from the 12th-17th fret, and try palm muting. Keep tension in your forearm, and try to keep the pick just barely touching the string. Also, dont strum. Make a small, rapid shaking motion. Ive also heard that strumming closer to the bridge helps.

Not sure about the harmonic. Could just be a bunch of artificial harmonics, which would be solved by keeping ur pick a pit higher, which would get your thumb further from the string. Not sure though.
#4
The best advice is something I learned from watching and listening to Paul Gilbert about Pick Dynamics.

Change your pick angle as it attacks the string. Instead of it being parallel to the string, angle the pick so less of it hits the string. As PG describes it, "it sounds like a cello."

I pick much cleaner and faster along with adding a new dynamic to my playing with this simple, but hard to master technique.

Good luck
#6
Quote by stringslinger6



#2 Pinch harmonics are only created when part of your finger or thumb accidentally touches the string immediately after your pick hits it.



Well I was thinking that I was either hitting it with my thumb or that instead of picking, sometimes I was just touching the string with the pick and causing the harmonic. I have already learned how to make pinch harmonics.


Thanks for the Video. I'll check it out.
#7
Ah wow That video helped a lot thanks! I just had an epiphany after watching it. When people were saying to angle it back I was turning the pick while keeping it parallel. I realized that they meant pick the string more with the side of the pick. That helped a ton.

I still have a lot of practicing to do, but that one small change made a world of difference.
#8
Quote by sporkman7
Keep tension in your forearm, and try to keep the pick just barely touching the string. Also, dont strum. Make a small, rapid shaking motion. Ive also heard that strumming closer to the bridge helps.


Tension is bad - it makes your playing uneven and one dimensional. True, accurate, tension free speed can be attained only through a great deal of effective practice, but the end goal is certainly worth it.

I recommend getting a metronome and setting it to about 60 bpm. Play four notes per click for one minute without tension using your wrist as the fulcrum for motion. Keep the movement small. Do this for a few minutes. Then relax for 30 seconds and do the same thing at 64 bpm. Increase your speed slowly as you go. When you reach the fastest you can do consistently for a minute, go back to 60 bpm and start over. It's boring, but it gets you faster as long as there is no tension in your arm and you use your wrist and the fulcrum, not your elbow.
#9
Quote by Geldin
Tension is bad - it makes your playing uneven and one dimensional. True, accurate, tension free speed can be attained only through a great deal of effective practice, but the end goal is certainly worth it.

I recommend getting a metronome and setting it to about 60 bpm. Play four notes per click for one minute without tension using your wrist as the fulcrum for motion. Keep the movement small. Do this for a few minutes. Then relax for 30 seconds and do the same thing at 64 bpm. Increase your speed slowly as you go. When you reach the fastest you can do consistently for a minute, go back to 60 bpm and start over. It's boring, but it gets you faster as long as there is no tension in your arm and you use your wrist and the fulcrum, not your elbow.


Will do. Thanks for the sound advice.