#2
It's not that it is bad. It actually has its high points.

For instance, it is much more resistant to changes in weather, climate, humidity, temperature, etc. than solid wood. Guitars made of laminate wood also always sound the same. So if you find one and love the way it sounds, you can buy it knowing that it will always sound pretty much exactly the same.

The reason that some might say it is "bad" is because it is tonally inferior to solid wood. A solid piece of wood is able to vibrate considerably more freely than laminate wood. This is why solid wood sounds better, and this is why people tend to prefer solid wood, especially for the top of the guitar.
#3
He's right, but TS should also know that crummy solid wood can still be worse than laminate. The negative perception comes mainly from the notion that laminate is an inexpensive (and thus inherently bad) imitation of the real deal. Though it is certainly cheaper, the sound depends more on how the guitar was put together rather than if it has true-wood construction or not. There are actually a fair number of OK sounding laminate guitars, and "OK sounding" is, in most cases, just fine for the beginner on a tight budget.
#4
i have to disagree that all laminate guitars sound the same.

the bracing pattern is still different from brand to brand and model to model which makes the guitar sound different.

my favorite laminate guitars are made by yamaha and alvarez. if you were wanting to purchase a cheap laminate guitar i would recommend those brands.
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#5
Quote by about
i have to disagree that all laminate guitars sound the same.

the bracing pattern is still different from brand to brand and model to model which makes the guitar sound different.

my favorite laminate guitars are made by yamaha and alvarez. if you were wanting to purchase a cheap laminate guitar i would recommend those brands.


I think Jim meant that they won't change tonally. Not that all guitars made of laminate will sound the same as each other.
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#6
the laminate guitars i play tend to have less sustain and usually less life to their sound, for want of a better word. many also have less volume. i played a higher priced yamaha laminate guitar against a fg730s, then had someone else play them so i could hear from the other side. the solid top sounded better, and i was able to guess which was which easily without looking when we tried it again.

also a good solid wood top or guitar will do what they call "opening up" over time, which can improve the sound of a guitar through the years where a laminate top won't do that.

btw, if you are either learning and broke, or want a guitar to carry around in the car, a good quality all-laminate guitar might be a worthy option. keep in mind, though, that a great sounding guitar can inspire someone who's learning.
Last edited by patticake at Jul 11, 2009,
#7
Quote by captivate
I think Jim meant that they won't change tonally. Not that all guitars made of laminate will sound the same as each other.

Correct. I should've been more clear.
#8
Quote by patticake
the laminate guitars i play tend to have less life to their sound...

That's it exactly. Not necessarily bad, just bland.