#3
If you have a floyd rose, get F-spaced
If not, get regular
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#5
Quote by brocmartens90
Regular.


um, he said Strat

The reason its called F spaced is because F stands for Fender. All Fenders use that spacing.
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Last edited by MonsterOfRock at Jul 10, 2009,
#6
Quote by MonsterOfRock
um, he said Strat

The reason its called F shaped spaced is because F stands for Fender Floyd Rose. All Fenders Floyd Rose equipped guitars use that spacing.


Um, I fixed your post.
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Justice4AllOne pretty much mentioned all of my ideas so yeah...pointless pun post.

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Thanks fer settin me straight on that Justice

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I was thinking that too, Justice usually seems like a pretty knowledgeable guy.
#7
Quote by MonsterOfRock
um, he said Strat

The reason its called F spaced is because F stands for Fender. All Fenders use that spacing.


F also stands for Floyd Rose and lots of brands make strat shaped guitars, so your Fender theory wouldnt exactly work there.
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Last edited by Oosh. at Jul 10, 2009,
#8
Quote by Justice4AllOne
Um, I fixed your post.


Do your research before you correct me mate. F stands for Fender. Floyd Roses use F spacing as well.

I challenge you to find a Fender guitar that doesnt use F spacing. My Strat certainly does.
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#9
Anyone, seriously, find a Fender that uses regular (gibson) spacing, then start an arguement.
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#10
Quote by MonsterOfRock
Do your research before you correct me mate. F stands for Fender. Floyd Roses use F spacing as well.

I challenge you to find a Fender guitar that doesnt use F spacing. My Strat certainly does.


Turns out we're both right.
F-Spaced pickups were released after the Floyd Rose, which used the same string spacing as most Fender guitars, hence the term.

Quote by FAQ@DiMarzio.com
What is F-spacing?


All of our full-size humbuckers except the X2N® are available in two polepiece spacings. F-spacing refers to the wider of the two spacings. For proper string alignment and balanced output, F-spaced humbuckers should be used in the bridge position on all guitars with string spacing at the bridge of 2.1" (53 mm) or greater. On these guitars, if the nut width is 1-11/16? (43 mm) or greater, F-spaced pickups can be used in the neck position as well.


Why are there two different spacings?


A long time ago (in the 20th century, actually) the electric guitar world was divided between Gibson and Fender designs. One of the differences between the two was string spacing. In general, Gibson chose a narrower string spacing at the bridge than Fender, and therefore the polepieces on Gibson humbuckers were closer together than the magnets on Fender pickups. When guitar shops started installing humbuckers in the bridge position of Strats, it was obvious that the strings didn?t line up with the polepieces, and if the E strings were too far outside, the sound could suffer. Our first humbuckers followed the original Gibson spacing, and we call them standard-spaced. When we released our first humbuckers with wider spacing, Floyd Rose bridges were very popular. Floyd string-spacing is the same as Fender spacing, so we naturally called the new pickups F-spaced.


So it stands for both, although some Gibsons use F-spacing (90s Les Pauls and Les Paul Jr.s), and modern American Standard Strats don't use F-spacing (they use a 2.0625 spacing, which is bigger than the 2.01 measurement for the F-space), as well as vintage American Strats, who have string spacing of 2.2875, which is much bigger than an F-spaced design.

There's more spacing than Gibson's usual 1.9 and Fender's usual 2.01, as I've just proven.

Btw, you could've just edited your post.
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Quote by TheJem
Justice4AllOne pretty much mentioned all of my ideas so yeah...pointless pun post.

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Thanks fer settin me straight on that Justice

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I was thinking that too, Justice usually seems like a pretty knowledgeable guy.
Last edited by Justice4AllOne at Jul 10, 2009,
#11
Quote by Oosh.
F also stands for Floyd Rose and lots of brands make strat shaped guitars, so your Fender theory wouldnt exactly work there.
BUT he said he has a strat. It has nothing to do with the body shape, it has to do with the bridge


People telling him to get a regular spaced pickup, the F-spaced pickup was made for guitars with Fender's string spacing, which includes all tremolo bridges. It was NOT made just for Floyd Rose guitars. Go take a Gibson and a Fender stratocaster, ANY Fender stratocaster and compare the string spacing, and you'll find that the Fender will have wider spacing and will need an F-spaced pickup. It's a ball park measure. Unless Fender suddenly decided to go with Gibson's string spacing lately then you get an F-spaced pickup.
Last edited by al112987 at Jul 10, 2009,
#12
Glad you done the research Justice

The word "F-Spaced" is most likely something DiMarzio made to distinguish, whereas Duncan refers them as "Trembuckers" and other 'trem' variations. Basically refering to tremolo bridges, FRs are merely a 'type' of tremolo bridge.

And yes, the slight variations in individual spacing aren't actually great variations. From what I've heard its for some kinda resonating purposes.
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#13
F-spaced.

Fender bridges have the same sized saddles as the Floyd bridges.

If you get a regular spaced pickup, your poles will be off by nearly 7/16" by the high e string.
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#14
straight from barenkuckle's site:
Wide or F(Fender) spacing is typical of trem equipped guitars and is 53mm as per original Fender spacing.

get F spaced for a fender. and btw, i would reccomend the d activator X or maybe the d sonic, the regular d activator'll sound too bright with a strat and a XXX
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#15
Measure it. If it's 53mm from the centre of the low e pole to the centre of the high e pole then it's F-Spaced.
...
#16
Quote by MonsterofRock
I challenge you to find a Fender guitar that doesnt use F spacing. My Strat certainly does.


Quote by Justice4AllOne
Turns out we're both right.
although some Gibsons use F-spacing (90s Les Pauls and Les Paul Jr.s), and modern American Standard Strats don't use F-spacing (they use a 2.0625 spacing, which is bigger than the 2.01 measurement for the F-space), as well as vintage American Strats, who have string spacing of 2.2875, which is much bigger than an F-spaced design.

There's more spacing than Gibson's usual 1.9 and Fender's usual 2.01, as I've just proven.


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