#1
Today I went shopping at my local guitar store. I use a mac and obviously have Garageband. I've wanted for a while to hook my guitar up to the line in port for easier recording and saving money, since I don't have a decent mic. I went in, asked for the adapter, but the only one they had was a headphone one (it has two rings around the jack, where as a line in only has one, so it should work, right?), which two people assured me would work, but I'd need a $150 Line6 Pod thingy. I was NOT gonna spend my money on that, seeing as you could plug directly in to my computer and supposedly it would work with Garageband. They told me it would destroy my sound card. Who was right?

tl;dr- I accidentally my whole $3. Is this dangerous?

EDIT: Also,
Last edited by coryklok at Jul 10, 2009,
#2
I don't know anything about sound cards. But what I do to record is I plug my guitar into my amp then my amp into the little jack that hooks into the computer. Works for me.
Quote by stevenpollock
You can't be successful in Jazz music until you're at least 40. You don't have anything to say.
#3
OK, I'm not exactly sure what you're saying, but this should clear it up.

I run...

Guitar -> Cable -> Multi-effects -> 1/4" Male, 1/8" Female Adapter (Has a plug as to plug into a guitar amp or effect pedal, but a smaller hole to use an mp3 jack) MP3 Jack, Mic on computer.

You could also do...

(after effect pedal) Cable -> 1/4" Female, 1/8" Male adapter (Guitar cable plugs into this, then plug goes to computer)

EDIT: I use audacity to record, works fine for me.
#4
I doubt it'd destroy your laptop but latency will be an issue.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#5
if you go to radio shack, you can get an addapter that you can plug your guitar chord directly into the audio in port... I use this and mac's soundcards are very durable... mine works fine after doing this for 3 years.
Quote by bass-boy-garith
Quote by guitarhero_764
I guess I'm kind of like a hippie. I'm anti-war, do drugs, and like communism.
Your not a hippie, just a ****ing moron.
#6
i have a cable that's headphone jack sized on one end, and instrument cable sized on the other. i don't know the exact names of the jack sizes, but it's easy to figure out. i'm sure you could find one on ebay or amazon. to use with garageband (i'm a mac user too) just plug that into your headphone jack and go. BUT it sounds awful. thin and awful haha to hear what i mean check out the song on my profile. the acoustic at the beginning was mic'd and the electric was not. the acoustic sounds decent (considering how crappy my mic was) and the electric sounds AWFUL.

i'd save up and invest in a decent (SM57) mic if i were you.
#7
I once did like guitar>multi effects>amp's line out>mic on computer but i blew my amp up..
Guitars
Jackson SL3MG
Ibanez RGR321EX
Kramer 120
Bass
Epiphone Embassy Standard V
Amp
Engl Ritchie Blackmore Signature
Pick
Jim Dunlop Max Grip Carbon Jazz III
Effects
Boss CH-1 Super Chorus
#8
if you have rockband you can plug the mic in your computer and record with that. thats what i do. sounds ****e **** but its cheap.
#9
Quote by 7stringusr
if you have rockband you can plug the mic in your computer and record with that. thats what i do. sounds ****e **** but its cheap.

Really you could do that with any USB mic.
Quote by stevenpollock
You can't be successful in Jazz music until you're at least 40. You don't have anything to say.
#10
Quote by 7stringusr
if you have rockband you can plug the mic in your computer and record with that. thats what i do. sounds ****e **** but its cheap.


it could definitely sound worse. thats the crappy mic i used for my profile's song haha

i'd recommend a Blue Snowball mic. small, cheap(-ish), and i've only heard good things about them. plus, if you're unfamiliar with garageband and you're just getting into it you might not want to spend too much on your set up
#12
You should check out the Original Recordings forum, there's a thread on programs you can use to simulate amp sounds and whatnot. Basically, what a POD does, but free.
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
Gibson Faded V
Warmoth Strat copy
Epiphone Hummingbird (FS!!)
Ibanez SR400QM
Fender BXR100
Reggae Bass Covers mahn!!!

#13
Get in riffs are recordings noaw
Epiphone Elitist SG (Serious)
Tokai Silver Star
Epiphone Dot
Epiphone Les Paul
Washburn J28SCEDL
Washburn J12S

G.A.S List

JCM600 (Yes a 600..)
#14
Quote by coryklok
Today I went shopping at my local guitar store. I use a mac and obviously have Garageband. I've wanted for a while to hook my guitar up to the line in port for easier recording and saving money, since I don't have a decent mic. I went in, asked for the adapter, but the only one they had was a headphone one (it has two rings around the jack, where as a line in only has one, so it should work, right?), which two people assured me would work, but I'd need a $150 Line6 Pod thingy. I was NOT gonna spend my money on that, seeing as you could plug directly in to my computer and supposedly it would work with Garageband. They told me it would destroy my sound card. Who was right?

tl;dr- I accidentally my whole $3. Is this dangerous?

EDIT: Also,


Sound card inputs are designed for a line level input. A guitar signal would need to be raised up to line level for a good sound and the excessive impedance mismatch could also damage your sound card, so I would not recommend a simple plug adapter. Browse the computer recording section of a few online music stores to find a variety of adapters designed for guitar. Here is one example.
.
.

Laziest Bassist Alive
Keep your gig. I'm sleeping.
.
.
#15
use Audacity, not garageband btw.
02 MiM Telecaster-----\__Digitech Whammy__TS-10__535q__DE-7__6505+ 112
91 Heartfield Talon II-/
#16
What a pod or toneport, or any digital multi effects processor for that matter does, is convert the signal to digital, which is then processed by your soundcard. This is ideal, as you don't have nearly as much latency to deal with (you soundcard doesn't have to convert the signal) and you don't have to worry about sending a high impedance signal into a low impedance signal and dealing with the subsequent loading down.

It is also safer because you don't have to worry about the input levels burning out the card.


BUT, I just built a small high impedance input buffer to deal with the loading down and I ran it into the soundcard on my PC. No problems. I'm using a toneport now, and it's one hell of a lot easier.