#1
Greetings All,

First post from a new guitarist, so please be nice

Basically, to cut a very long story short, I just want to know if there's any reason not to use power chords and open chords in the same progression.

For example, using the key of A...

C#m, A, E, Bm sounds ok, but with the heavier sound I'm after, I prefer...

C#m, A, E, B5 (that's the correct notation for a B power chord, right?).

Is there any reason not to do that? Or can anyone suggest another chord from outside the standard chords in that key that will give the same sort of sound?
#3
I don't know. Like I said, I'm new to the whole thing and really have no idea what I'm doing yet
#4
yeah that's fine. a power chord can be used in place of almost any chord since it is neither major nor minor. any chord that has a perfect fifth from the root note can be substituted for a power chord.
#5
Quote by Troutzilla
Greetings All,

First post from a new guitarist, so please be nice

Basically, to cut a very long story short, I just want to know if there's any reason not to use power chords and open chords in the same progression.

For example, using the key of A...

C#m, A, E, Bm sounds ok, but with the heavier sound I'm after, I prefer...

C#m, A, E, B5 (that's the correct notation for a B power chord, right?).

Is there any reason not to do that? Or can anyone suggest another chord from outside the standard chords in that key that will give the same sort of sound?


Yes B5 is a B power chord. It's my understanding that by changing it to a power chord you change the chord progression. But then again I never understood how power chords go in together with chord progressions since technically a power chord isn't really a chord at all.
#6
Excellent, thank you.

Expect more n00b questions soon. I'll try my best to avoid ones that are obviously covered in FAQs
#8
Quote by sammo_boi
no, that isn't true. a power chord is definitely a real chord.


By definition, no it is not sir.

From dictionary.com:
chord 1 (kôrd, kōrd)
n.

1. Music A combination of three or more pitches sounded simultaneously.
2. Harmony, as of color.

v. chord·ed, chord·ing, chords
#9
Quote by Guitarfreak777
By definition, no it is not sir.

From dictionary.com:
chord 1 (kôrd, kōrd)
n.

1. Music A combination of three or more pitches sounded simultaneously.
2. Harmony, as of color.

v. chord·ed, chord·ing, chords


dude, a power chord consists of three notes (a the root, a perfect fifth, and an octave of the root). how is that not a chord?
#10
Quote by sammo_boi
dude, a power chord consists of three notes (a the root, a perfect fifth, and an octave of the root). how is that not a chord?

Three different notes.
I've heard it both ways
#12
Quote by sammo_boi
dude, a power chord consists of three notes (a the root, a perfect fifth, and an octave of the root). how is that not a chord?


A chord is 3 different notes.

Because there are only 2 notes, the root and the 5th. The octave is just the root played higher.

So a power chord is really just an interval or dyad.

*edit*

A power chord is 2 notes, a root and a 5th, more of those 2 notes can be played, but that still does not make it a chord.
Last edited by Guitarfreak777 at Jul 11, 2009,