#1
Hello UG i am new here so please excuse me if this is in the wrong forum or something and please excuse my English im Lithuanian . I started playing electric almost a year ago and self taught. I also play my father's classical guitar i enjoy playing them both very much but i think i must get lessons if i want to learn further. But which lessons will teach me more and will be more useful as a musician? Any advice or anything will be appreciated.
#2
it all depends on preference. if you want to play mostly classical guitar, find a classical teacher. if you want to play electric guitar, find a teacher who specialises in electric guitar or a teacher who teaches guitar in general, as i dont know how many people teach JUST electric.

if you got a good guitar teacher who could teach most genres, then you could just tell him what sort of style you want to specialise in, and he'll base his lessons around that.

hope i helped, good luck.
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#4
Classical lessons. The teacher will most likely be much more highly educated in music and theory, get you to read music, etc. Any classical player can pretty much easily learn other styles, but it's much harder to transition to a high level of classical guitar solely by playing electric. Also, some may disagree, but classical takes A LOT more technique. If you learn your right hand position wrong, you could develop major problems.
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#5
Classical. As much as I hated it when I started, it layed the foundation for me as a musician, and the technique I learned from it definately helped me learn everything else.
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#6
Thanks everybody i decided ill be taking classical guitar lessons. I already found a tutor and will start when i come back to the states in a month hope i didn't collect to many bad techniques
#7
I guess a teacher would be good, they teach you about timing, maybe dynamics and quality/tone. Other than that, I think the best advice is that you watch some youtube videos, play some pieces you like until you learn them well. Try learning some complicated (not too complicated if you're not there yet) pieces too.
I've developed pretty good technique in 6 months by just doing my own thing =] But the part I need to work on is my timing/tempo keeping it steady and perfect. Most of the time because I don't have the real sheet to it and aren't too good at figuring out the correct, perfect timing just by listening to it (since I find so many different timings and versions). By the end, I just end up making my own thing =P Same exact notes but it usually lacks a good tempo to the trained ear.
Last edited by ILLcoyote at Jul 14, 2009,
#8
If you can play an classical guitar, it only a VERY little step towards electric, because it's much easier. But of course if you want to play electrical only, it'd be better to get electrical lessons. You have to see it this way: You don't have to be able to use a typemachine to be able to use a keyboard of a computer.

However i would suggest classical lessons because it doesn't matter how much you're interested in hard rock or metal, once you will want to try to play a classical song. (My own experience..)
#9
^hmmm it depends. There are MANY electric songs that are alot of easier than the classicalish pieces I've seen around =P It does get tough. For example, a beginner at guitar can pick up an electric, learn power chords and play a Rammstein type of thing which is decently easy. Now try him learning some classical piece with its complicated chords and stuff and see which he learns first

But of course, there's also many metal-shredding electric songs that are harder than a classical piece. I think classical guitar develops your left hand in a good way with its complicated chords, scales here and there and the wider neck. Once you go to electric the neck is smaller so it might be easier to play scales there then. The part you would have to work on is your picking with a pick though. Depends on the style you'd end up playing on the electric though.

But hey, I'm able to play things like The Four Horsemen by Metallica on a classical guitar with just my fingers, except for the solo, not there yet =P. But I can with a pick...
Last edited by ILLcoyote at Jul 16, 2009,