#1
im building a guitar from scratch for the first time and ive found a nice peice of alder online, but it says its not kiln dried. so does the wood for electric guitars have to be kiln dried
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#2
It depends how freshly cut it is.

If its recently cut, yes.

If its been air drying for a while, you'll be fine.
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#3
It doesnt have to be kiln dried, but it has to be dry.

6 to 8 % moisture content optimal.




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#4
Quote by blindsagacity
It depends how freshly cut it is.

If its recently cut, yes.

If its been air drying for a while, you'll be fine.

the page says it has been drying since march 20th is that too recent
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#5
Quote by shift3448
the page says it has been drying since march 20th is that too recent


I'm not sure that's enough seasoning. Where is it drying? Which state? March is usually a damp month for many northern states because snow is still around or is melting.

You need it to have a 6% to 8% moisture content.

EDIT: And when I mention March, I just mean that if it's been drying since March, it's had April and May to sit through and now June (a very humid month this year where I'm from) so the wood may not have dried much at all.
Last edited by Camm at Jul 12, 2009,
#6
im asuming washington cause thats where the sale tax is on the page
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#8
Quote by Schism1985
I heard somewhere that wood is supposed to air dry one year for every inch thick that it is.


This. It varies slightly depending on the wood, but this is a very good estimation. Wood should ideally be dried in a controlled environment, not just outside.
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#9
Quote by Schism1985
I heard somewhere that wood is supposed to air dry one year for every inch thick that it is.


That would make some sense. It'd just be a general rule of thumb open to many variables though.

I'm a cabinet maker's apprentice, so I only use 7% kiln dried wood. I'm not an expert on air seasoned wood, I just know that it's not a fast process, or even a good one.