#1
I have two questions regarding chords and modes.

1. I know in a scale such as the C lydian there are 7 degrees or 8 if you consider the octave i dont know if you do. In C lydian there is I C, II D, III E, IV F#, V G, VI A, VII B.
Correct me if im wrong so now the chords idk what this is called but not the 7ths or anything or wierd chords just like major minor "normal chords" so to speak would be
C major,D major, E minor, F# dim?, G major, A minor, B minor , then c major again. Is that right?
2 Using those chords in a progression would be I,II,III,IV,V,VI,VII,I right? ,and i know the chords are important in bringing out the modes tone so it sounds like lydian is supposed, so will using these chords in a progression with a rythm playing the chords and a lead on top bring out the modes tone?

Im a newbie so if i got ANYTHING wrong jsut help me out and correct me thanks.[/U
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#2
1. Ok, When you do the chord degrees, it should look like this: I, II, iii, iv*, V, vi, vii
upper case is Major, lower is minor, and the * indecates dimished (it should be a degree symbol in the same position). So you are right, but your notation is wrong.

2. a chord progression could be any set of chords, who's "melodic arch" begins and resolves on the tonic (fist degree) of the mode that you're using. So a chord progression COULD be: I, V, vi, V, II, I.

The mode itself does not have a "tone" per-say, but a certian attitude assosiated with it. Locrian for example, is commpnly used in death metal because of it's intense disinant mood.

And, yes, as long as the melody resolves on the tonic of the mode, the "attitude" of the mode will be preserved.

GREAT QUESTIONS!
#3
Quote by baronvonbadguy3
Using those chords in a progression would be I,II,III,IV,V,VI,VII,I right?

Not quite. In Lydian it would be I II iii iv° V vi vii
#4
Quote by baronvonbadguy3
will using these chords in a progression with a rythm playing the chords and a lead on top bring out the modes tone?

That depends, If you use too many chords then your progression will likely pull towards Gmaj instead of Cmaj, and if you play C lydian over that then it will sound like G major instead.
This is a great thread about modal progressions: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=999592
#5
Quote by the white baron
That depends, If you use too many chords then your progression will likely pull towards Gmaj instead of Cmaj, and if you play C lydian over that then it will sound like G major instead.
This is a great thread about modal progressions: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=999592

True, I suggest you put more emphasis on the I and V chord. Normally I'd also include the subdominant chord but seeing as how in Lydian it's diminished, you can avoid it.
#6
Quote by SEALSniper1152
a chord progression could be any set of chords, who's "melodic arch" begins and resolves on the tonic (fist degree) of the mode that you're using.
Does a progression have to start and stop with the tonic? What do you mean with the melodic arch?
#7
Quote by Withakay
Does a progression have to start and stop with the tonic?

It's not a requirement but ending with the tonic makes it resolve.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jul 12, 2009,
#8
have a look for xxdarrenxx's post. I think you can find it in his sig. He gives a very solid rundown on practical use of modes and ideas for different chord sequences from the various modes.

Lydian is just like the major scale but it is flavoured by an augmented fourth as opposed to the natural fourth found in the major scale.

The fourth degree of the scale is found in the chords built off the second degree, the fourth degree, and the seventh degree and a seventh chord off the fifth degree.

If C is your tonic then your Lydian mode, C Lydian, would be C D E F♯ G A B C.
(No you don't have to include the octave. It is a seven note scale).

And the chords built from this mode would be
C E G = C major
D F♯ A = D major
E G B = E minor
F♯ A C = F♯ diminished
G B D = G major
A C E = A minor
B D F♯ = B minor.

Now you can use any number of these basic triads or seventh chords extended or altered chords to create a chord progression. What makes it Lydian is the fact that it has a tonal centre, or resolves to C major and features an F♯ instead of an F.

However, if you really want to get into how different modes sound try just playing a Major or Minor chord vamp and try major or minor mode over the vamps.

For example play a C major vamp and try C Ionian, C Lydian, and then C Mixolydian over that chord.

Or try a C minor vamp and play C Aeolian, C Dorian, and C Phrygian over it to listen for the sound of those modes.
Si
#9
^ Or, for simplicity's sake, just hit your low E string, let it ring while you then play E Ionian, E Dorian, E Phrygian, etc.

A good Lydian vamp is just II-I. The flavor note (the note(s) that make the mode unique, in this case the #4) is present in the 3rd of the II. Having the flavor notes in the 3rd is usually the best option, but if that fails then your next best bet is the 7th. Building a triad with the flavor note as the root is iffy. For Lydian, it's a diminished chord, so that's already out of the question for a short vamp.
i don't know why i feel so dry